Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • "timdifford" shared from Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown
    Only when we admit we have made a mistake in committing to something can we make a mistake a part of our past. When we remain in denial, on the other hand, we continue to circle pointlessly. There should be no shame in admitting to a mistake; after all, we really are only admitting that we are now wiser than we once were.
    Note: True
  • "timdifford" shared from Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown
    Individuals are equally vulnerable to sunk-cost bias. It explains why we’ll continue to sit through a terrible movie because we’ve already paid the price of a ticket. It explains why we continue to pour money into a home renovation that never seems to near completion. It explains why we’ll continue to wait for a bus or a subway train that never comes instead of hailing a cab, and it explains why we invest in toxic relationships even when our efforts only make things worse.
    Note: @euan re abandoning books etc >
  • "timdifford" shared from Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown
    the answer isn’t a definite yes then it should be a no
    Note: Yes.
  • "timdifford" shared from Mountain of the Dead: The Dyatlov Pass Incident by Keith McCloskey
    A known practice – one that was common enough to have its own nickname – was for a potential escapee to identify someone who would make the escape with him (or her) on the basis that the two of them would stand a better chance of succeeding. Once they had escaped and hunger started to become a problem, the person who had initiated the escape would kill his or her companion and eat them. This applied to larger groups of escapees as well, where unfortunate victims would be identified beforehand and set upon when the time was right. The nickname for these victims was ‘Walking Larders’.12
    Note: Blimey
  • "timdifford" shared from Mountain of the Dead: The Dyatlov Pass Incident by Keith McCloskey
    In conditions of extreme cold, the body attempts to protect itself by moving blood away from the extremities and into the centre of the body (the core of the body) in order to protect the vital organs. This is why hands and feet become noticeably colder first while this is happening. The way that the movement of blood away from the extremities is achieved is by vasoconstriction of the peripheral circulation. Basically, the body is attempting to insulate the inner core by losing less heat. Vasoconstriction is the vascular contraction of the smooth muscles, and this effort of contraction requires...
    Note: Paradoxical Undressing.