Recent Activity

  • Adam shared from Einstein Never Used Flashcards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Diane Eyer
    Imitation Ages: Birth to 2 months Hold your new baby on your lap. While looking closely at her, stick out your tongue about 10 times slowly and see if she answers back by sticking her tongue out at you. If it works, this may be one of the only times that you will enjoy having someone stick their tongue out at you! Or try opening your mouth wide about 10 times slowly and see if your baby can do that. It is exciting to know that your newborn is already able to mimic your actions, thereby communicating with you.
    Note: Did not know this! Going to try it in Sept!
  • Adam shared from Einstein Never Used Flashcards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Diane Eyer
    great book for children this age is My Book about Me, by Me Myself with Some Help
  • Adam shared from Working Effectively with Legacy Code by Michael Feathers
    In general, global variables are a bad idea
    Note: Hell yea
  • Adam shared from Working Effectively with Legacy Code by Michael Feathers
    Pulling classes out of existing projects for testing really changes your idea of what "good" is with regard to design.
    Note: My experience to a T
  • Adam shared from Working Effectively with Legacy Code by Michael Feathers
    When we write tests for individual units, we end up with small, well-understood pieces. This can make it easier to reason about our code.
  • Adam shared from Einstein Never Used Flashcards: How Our Children Really Learn--and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Diane Eyer
    So why does knowing letter names seem to correlate so highly with reading success? It's not that knowing the letter names per se matters, because even children who have reading problems can sometimes know their letter names. It's because when preschoolers know their letter names, it reveals another fact about their experience: These are children who have been read to a lot and who have had the good fortune to engage in lots of emergent literacy activities. Picking up the letter names for most of them is incidental to the many pre-reading literacy activities they have done.
    Note: This book is amazing
  • Adam shared from Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World by Jane McGonigal
    If I’m going to be happy anywhere, Or achieve greatness anywhere, Or learn true secrets anywhere, Or save the world anywhere, Or feel strongly anywhere, Or help people anywhere, I may as well do it in reality.   —FUTURIST ELIEZER YUDKOWSKY 1  
    Note: well said
  • Adam shared from Do the Work by Steven Pressfield
    NEVER act and reflect at the same time.
    Note: right on!
(Norton, MA United States)
Adam P Schepis