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  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    Johnson continued bellowing at Bruce in front of Kennedy staffers Ted Sorensen and Ken O’Donnell. Bruce was humiliated. “I will not work here any longer, being treated like this!” he told Usher Nelson Pierce later that night. “I’m never going to get over President Kennedy’s death.” The next day, Johnson acted as though nothing had happened—and Bruce decided that the only way to manage this new difficult president would be to refuse to back down. “It was obvious to me that if I started scraping and bowing when he lost his temper, that would be the end of me.” Bruce knew Johnson...
    Note: Thevl civil rights person...a hippocrote?
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    Johnson’s intensity, and his outright bullying, caused many staffers to go out of their way to avoid him. “The clearest sign of how different he was from other presidents was that normally a half a dozen staffers and hangers-on would walk the president from the Oval Office to the residence,” said former chief usher Rex Scouten. “With President Johnson, only the Secret Service agents walked home with him.” Doorman Preston Bruce first ran afoul of Johnson on the very day the Johnsons moved into the White House. That day, the president invited more than two hundred people to a reception...
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    The Bushes genuinely seemed to appreciate the workers’ sacrifices, and in turn the staff went out of its way to make them happy. The kitchen staff knew that Barbara Bush hated it when people sang “Happy Birthday to You.” “On the campaign trail I would have four birthday cakes in one day from people who really didn’t give a darn about me,” she told me with her usual candor. “One day I came home for lunch and there was a dessert on my plate—incidentally, you do eat very well at the White House—and there was a little tiny square cake and it had the musical notes to ‘Happy Birthday...
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    President George H. W. Bush and his family seems to have stemmed from the family’s accessible demeanor. The Bushes put everyone at ease around them. Barbara Bush remembered one scene during the Persian Gulf War when she was anxiously watching the news. As she was waiting for her husband to walk in, White House Maître d’ George Hannie asked her, “What would you like to drink? And what do you think Pops would like?” (While some in the media have taken to calling him “Poppy” Bush since his son’s presidency, “Pops” was a nickname from President Bush’s youth; while he was in the...
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    Lyndon Johnson had ways of getting around the rules governing food deliveries to the White House (which were less stringent in the 1960s). The president happened to love the blintzes made by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara’s wife, Margaret, and from time to time she asked her husband to get a batch to Johnson by handing them off to someone at the White House. Once McNamara gave the blintzes to a police officer, who handed them to the Secret Service. The blintzes were destroyed, and when McNamara asked Johnson if he enjoyed his wife’s latest batch of blintzes, the president grew furious....
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    IN A HOUSE where even a minor bit of gossip could make national headlines, Bill and Hillary Clinton had a difficult time learning to trust the staff. The reason they changed the White House phone system was to ensure that no one could listen in on their private conversations—a move that frustrated the ushers, who had a trusted
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    President Johnson often undressed in front of staffers and was famous for rattling off orders while he was sitting on the toilet. Once, reporter Frank Cormier was shocked to see Air Force One Steward Sergeant and Valet Paul Glynn kneel before the president while they were in midair and wash his feet—all the more so because Johnson never once acknowledged Glynn. “Talking all the while, Johnson paid no heed except to cross his legs in the opposite direction when it was time for Glynn to attend to the other foot,” Cormier observed. After witnessing this, Cormier said, he was unfazed when he...
    Note: The civil rights leader who voted against civil rights in 1957. Another Obama. Another Hillary.
  • Adriane shared from The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Brower
    On the day they moved into the White House, Steve Ford called his best friend, Kevin Kennedy, who lived around the corner from him in Alexandria. “Kevin, we finally moved in. You gotta come over—you gotta see this place.” He cleared his friend through security and gave him a tour, showing him his room on the third floor and taking him to the Solarium, with its rooftop access. They took out a stereo and blasted Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” on a turntable on the roof of the White House. “That was my first night in the White House,” Ford said. “Eugene, the butler, knew what...
  • Adriane shared from The Revolt Against the Masses: How Liberalism Has Undermined the Middle Class by Fred Siegel
    allies, liberalism has been dedicated to preserving the problems for which it presents itself as the solution. In today’s America, those who claim to be morally superior all too often enjoy both neo-Gilded Age wealth and close ties to government. After the government-driven failures and excesses of the past forty years, liberalism has become an ugly blend of sanctimony, self-interest, and social connections. When the editor-in-chief of the popular liberal website Slate, frustrated with opposition to Obama’s expansion of the federal government, entitled an article “Down with the People,”...
  • Adriane shared from The Revolt Against the Masses: How Liberalism Has Undermined the Middle Class by Fred Siegel
    The best short credo of liberalism came from the pen of the once canonical left-wing literary historian Vernon Parrington in the late 1920s. “Rid society of the dictatorship of the middle class,” Parrington insisted, referring to both democracy and capitalism, “and the artist and the scientist will erect in America a civilization that may become, what civilization was in earlier days, a thing to be respected.” Alienated from middle-class American life, liberalism drew on an idealized image of “organic” pre-modern folkways and rhapsodized about a future harmony that would reestablish...
(Florence, SC, US)
Adriane