About Andrew Means

I'm 26, married, and live in Chicago's Bucktown community. I recently graduated from The University of Chicago Harris School and help people use data to make smarter decisions.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Andrew shared from The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism by Doris Kearns Goodwin
    It would result in “a dreadful calamity,” Roosevelt told a conservative friend, to see the nation “divided into two parties, one containing the bulk of the property owners and conservative people, the other the bulk of the wageworkers and the less prosperous people generally; each party insisting upon demanding much that was wrong, and each party sullen and angered by real and fancied grievances.
    Note: Prescient.
  • Andrew shared from The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism by Doris Kearns Goodwin
    It would result in “a dreadful calamity,” Roosevelt told a conservative friend, to see the nation “divided into two parties, one containing the bulk of the property owners and conservative people, the other the bulk of the wageworkers and the less prosperous people generally; each party insisting upon demanding much that was wrong, and each party sullen and angered by real and fancied grievances.
    Note: Prescient.
  • Andrew shared from Knowing God by J. I. Packer
    The more complex the object, the more complex is the knowing of it.
    Note: On knowing God.
  • Andrew shared from Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-63 by Taylor Branch
    King was controlled. He never shouted. But he preached like someone who wanted to shout, and this gave him an electrifying hold over the congregation. Though still a boy to many of his older listeners, he had the commanding air of a burning sage.
    Note: Dr Kings preaching style.
  • Andrew shared from Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-63 by Taylor Branch
    Horrified Social Gospel reviewers implied that Niebuhr’s emphasis on sin made him a traitor to progress, or even a fundamentalist. That same emphasis might have endeared him to religious conservatives, but they could not bring themselves to compliment a man who routinely questioned the literal truth of the Bible and who criticized Franklin Roosevelt as too conservative.
    Note: More on the awesome Niebuhr.
(Chicago, IL)
Andrew Means