Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Angie shared from Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison
    Note: If you have an interest in guitars, heavy metal bands, fine automobiles, electronic games, life-long effects of dysfunctional childhoods, social un-acceptance, battles overcome, what it's like to grow up Aspergian (and not know it) or just life in general...YOU SHOULD READ THIS BOOK!
  • Angie shared from Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison
    Psychologists have done studies of people petting animals. They’ve proven it has a calming effect on the people, lowering their heart rate and blood pressure. I wonder why they haven’t done studies of people petting people. Normal people haven’t caught on to the benefits.
  • Angie shared from Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison
    My conversational difficulties highlight a problem Aspergians face every day. A person with an obvious disability—for example, someone in a wheelchair—is treated compassionately because his handicap is obvious. No one turns to a guy in a wheelchair and says, “Quick! Let’s run across the street!” And when he can’t run across the street, no one says, “What’s his problem?” They offer to help him across the street. With me, though, there is no external sign that I am conversationally handicapped. So folks hear some conversational misstep and say, “What an arrogant jerk!” I look...
    Note: As much as this made Jack and I laugh, it is an unfortunately true statement.
  • Angie shared from Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen
    When your cup is empty, you do not mourn what is gone. Because if you do, you will miss the opportunity to fill it again.
  • Angie shared from Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen
    Note: She understood that the hardest times in life to go through were when you were transitioning from one version of yourself to another.