Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Carol Tavris recounts a story about a Bengali cobra that liked to bite passing villagers. One day a swami—a man who has achieved self-mastery—convinces the snake that biting is wrong. The cobra vows to stop immediately, and does. Before long, the village boys grow unafraid of the snake and start to abuse him. Battered and bloodied, the snake complains to the swami that this is what came of keeping his promise. “I told you not to bite,” said the swami, “but I did not tell you not to hiss.”
    Note: Life Lesson #462
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Other studies have also found unusual levels of persistence in even very young Asian children. For example, the cross-cultural psychologist Priscilla Blinco gave Japanese and American first graders an unsolvable puzzle to work on in solitude, without the help of other children or a teacher, and compared how long they tried before giving up. The Japanese children spent an average of 13.93 minutes on the puzzle before calling it quits, whereas the American kids spent only 9.47 minutes. Fewer than 27 percent of the American students persisted as long as the average Japanese student—and only 10...
    Note: Wait, what's to say the American kids didn't just figure out it was unsolvble first?
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    We met at an outdoor café, where we sat next to a coed group of athletes erupting regularly in laughter. Mike nodded at the athletes, all of whom were white. Caucasians, he said, seem to be “less afraid of other people thinking that what they said was too loud or too stupid.”
    Note: This sounds familiar...
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Asian attitudes to the spoken word: talk is for communicating need-to-know information; quiet and introspection are signs of deep thought and higher truth. Words are potentially dangerous weapons that reveal things better left unsaid. They hurt other people; they can get their speaker into trouble. Consider, for example, these proverbs from the East: The wind howls, but the mountain remains still. —JAPANESE PROVERB Those who know do not speak. Those who speak do not know. —LAO ZI, The Way of Lao Zi Even though I make no special attempt to observe the discipline of silence, living alone automatically...
    Note: A nice culture dichotomy
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Introverts receive disproportionate numbers of graduate degrees, National Merit Scholarship finalist positions, and Phi Beta Kappa keys. They outperform extroverts on the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal test, an assessment of critical thinking widely used by businesses for hiring and promotion. They’ve been shown to excel at something psychologists call “insightful problem solving.”
    Note: ...or this
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Here are some of the things we know about the relative performance of introverts and extroverts at complex problem-solving. Extroverts get better grades than introverts during elementary school, but introverts outperform extroverts in high school and college. At the university level, introversion predicts academic performance better than cognitive ability. One study tested 141 college students’ knowledge of twenty different subjects, from art to astronomy to statistics, and found that introverts knew more than the extroverts about every single one of them.
    Note: Education Connection never told me this...
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    At about the same time I evaluated that portfolio of loans, I heard a story circulating on Wall Street about a competition among investment banks for a prestigious piece of business. Each of the major banks sent a squad of their top employees to pitch the client. Each team deployed the usual tools: spread sheets, “pitch books,” and PowerPoint presentations. But the winning team added its own piece of theatrics: they ran into the room wearing matching baseball caps and T-shirts emblazoned with the letters FUD, an acronym for Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt. In this case FUD had been crossed out...
    Note: 2008, everybody
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    In one fourth-grade classroom I visited, a big sign announced the “Rules for Group Work,” including, YOU CAN’T ASK A TEACHER FOR HELP UNLESS EVERYONE IN YOUR GROUP HAS THE SAME QUESTION.
    Note: The death of "learn at your own pace."
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Even businesses that employ many artists, designers, and other imaginative types often display a preference for extroversion. “We want to attract creative people,” the director of human resources at a major media company told me. When I asked what she meant by “creative,” she answered without missing a beat. “You have to be outgoing, fun, and jazzed up to work here.”
    Note: THESAURUS, PLEASE
  • Anthony shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    If Abraham Lincoln was the embodiment of virtue during the Culture of Character, then Tony Robbins is his counterpart during the Culture of Personality. Indeed, when Tony mentions that he once thought of running for president of the United States, the audience erupts in loud cheers.
    Note: Surely this won't inflate one's ego.
(Malvern, PA)
Anthony Skatz