Recent Activity

  • Arto shared from Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time by Brian Tracy
    just because somebody sends me an e-mail, it does not mean that they own a piece of my life in terms of my having to reply to them, now or ever.
  • Arto shared from Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies) by Janice (Ginny) Redish
    Marketing departments are accustomed to thinking in terms of how to draw people in. On the web, however, your primary worry should be how not to drive away the people who have chosen to come to your site.
  • Arto shared from Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies) by Janice (Ginny) Redish
    Blind web users scan with their ears. They listen to only a few words before deciding whether to keep going. With their screen-readers, blind web users can jump to the next link or the next heading or the next paragraph - and they do so at an amazingly rapid pace.
    Note: blind web users scan too
  • Arto shared from Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies) by Janice (Ginny) Redish
    What do your site visitors want to know? Need to know? • Do they really care about the entire history of your project? Probably not. • Do they care about the detailed legal reference for your right to ask them for information? Probably not. • Do they want to hear how much you welcome them before you show them what you have to offer at what price? Probably not. That content may be important to you, but if it isn’t important to your site visitors, drop it entirely, put it at the bottom of the page, or layer it with a link to another page.
    Note: Should be obvious like many thingslike this
  • Arto shared from Designing with Web Standards (Voices That Matter) by Jeffrey Zeldman, Ethan Marcotte
    On the Mac, 7pt type was 7px tall, making it illegible, and as useless as a beard on a baby.
    Note: as useless as a beard on a baby
  • Arto shared from Designing with Web Standards (Voices That Matter) by Jeffrey Zeldman, Ethan Marcotte
    One of your CSS rules might be incorrectly written, yet your favorite browser understood what you intended, as a friend sometimes understands you when you talk with your mouth full.