Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Ben shared from Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke
    These creatures had been carved by someone who had never seen a lion or a dragon, but who had seen a great many dogs and sheep and something of the character of a dog and a sheep had got into his carving.
  • Ben shared from Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke
    He picks up a book and begins to read, but he is not attending to what he reads and he has got to page 22 before he discovers it is a novel – the sort of work which above all others he most despises – and he puts it down in disgust.
  • Ben shared from The Human Division (Old Man's War) by John Scalzi
    “Do you poop?” asked a boy. “Brian Winters,” Mrs. Everston said, severely. “It’s a valid question!” the boy said, protesting. He was apparently the sort of eight-year-old boy for whom it made sense to have the phrase “it’s a valid question” in his repertoire.
  • Ben shared from The Jennifer Morgue (A Laundry Files Novel) by Charles Stross
    James Bond is a creature of fantasy, perhaps best described using a literary term looted from that most curious and least respected of fields, fan fiction: the Mary-Sue. A Mary-Sue character is a placeholder in a script, a hollow cardboard cutout into whose outline the author can squeeze their own dreams and fantasies. In the case of Bond, it’s cruelly easy to make a case that the famous spy was his author’s Mary-Sue, for Fleming had a curious and ambiguous relationship with spying.
    Note: Charles Stross on James Bond:
  • Ben shared from The Jennifer Morgue (A Laundry Files Novel) by Charles Stross
    James Bond is a creature of fantasy, perhaps best described using a literary term looted from that most curious and least respected of fields, fan fiction: the Mary-Sue. A Mary-Sue character is a placeholder in a script, a hollow cardboard cutout into whose outline the author can squeeze their own dreams and fantasies. In the case of Bond, it’s cruelly easy to make a case that the famous spy was his author’s Mary-Sue, for Fleming had a curious and ambiguous relationship with spying.
    Note: Charles Stross on James Bond:
(Portland, OR USA)
Ben Bleything