Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Ben shared from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    As I went over to say good-by I saw that the expression of bewilderment had come back into Gatsby’s face, as though a faint doubt had occurred to him as to the quality of his present happiness. Almost five years! There must have been moments even that afternoon when Daisy tumbled short of his dreams — not through her own fault, but because of the colossal vitality of his illusion. It had gone beyond her, beyond everything. He had thrown himself into it with a creative passion, adding to it all the time, decking it out with every bright feather that drifted his way. No amount of fire or freshness...
    Note: The Great Gatsby
  • Ben shared from Everything That Remains: A Memoir by The Minimalists by Joshua Fields Millburn, Ryan Nicodemus
    “Because old relationships are convenient, and starting new relationships is difficult—it requires work. But so does anything worth holding on to.” “But sometimes we hold on too long.” “Yep. We’ve all held on to someone who didn’t deserve to be there before. And most of us still have someone in our lives who continually drains us: Someone who isn’t supportive. Someone who takes and takes and takes without giving back to the relationship. Someone who contributes very little and prevents us from growing. Someone who constantly plays the victim.”
    Note: holding on to old relationships instead of establishiblishing new ones
  • Ben shared from Everything That Remains: A Memoir by The Minimalists by Joshua Fields Millburn, Ryan Nicodemus
    ‘Reject the basic assumptions of civilization, especially the importance of material possessions,’
    Note: reject the basic assumptions of civilization
  • Ben shared from Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers by David Perlmutter
    Our caveman ancestors did in fact eat fruit, but not every day of the year.
    Note: caveman ancestors ate fruit- just not everyday
  • Ben shared from Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers by David Perlmutter
    High-fructose corn syrup was introduced in 1978 as a cheap replacement for table sugar in beverages and food products.
    Note: High Fructose Corn Syrup created in 1978

Ben

(Tulsa, OK, United States)
Ben