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  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    Caloric intake and expenditure are intimately related: increasing one will cause an increase in the other. This is the biological principle of homeostasis. The body tries to maintain a stable state. Reducing Calories In reduces Calories Out. Increasing Calories Out increases Calories In.
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    dismal truth: whether physical activity increases or decreases, it has virtually no relationship to the prevalence of obesity. Increasing exercise did not reduce obesity. It was irrelevant. Certain states exercised more. Other states exercised less. Obesity increased by the same amount
    Note: Exercise is not the answer.
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    At some point, we go back to our old way of eating. Since metabolism has slowed so much, even resuming the old way of eating causes quick weight gain, up to and even a little past the original point. We are doing exactly what our hormones are influencing us to do. But friends, family and medical professionals silently blame the victim, thinking that it is “our fault.” And we ourselves feel that we are a failure. Sound familiar?
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    Reduced metabolism and the increased hunger are not the cause of obesity—they are the result. Losing weight causes the reduced metabolism and increased hunger, not the other way around. We do not simply make a personal choice to eat more. One of the great pillars of the caloric-reduction theory of obesity—that we eat too much because we choose to—is simply not true. We do not eat too much because we choose to, or because food is too delicious, or because of salt, sugar and fat. We eat too much because our own brain compels us to.
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    Losing weight triggers two important responses. First, total energy expenditure is immediately and indefinitely reduced in order to conserve the available energy. Second, hormonal hunger signaling is immediately and indefinitely amplified in an effort to acquire more food. Weight loss results in increased hunger and decreased metabolism. This evolutionary survival strategy has a single purpose: to make us regain the lost weight.
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    Note: Reducing calories DOES NOT WORK. Your body simply reduces your metabolic rate to match your reduced intake.
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    The simple truth is that weight loss comes down to understanding the hormonal roots of obesity. Insulin is the main driver. Obesity is a hormonal, not a caloric imbalance.
  • Ben shared from The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss by Jason Fung
    The simple truth is that weight loss comes down to understanding the hormonal roots of obesity. Insulin is the main driver.
  • Ben shared from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    As I went over to say good-by I saw that the expression of bewilderment had come back into Gatsby’s face, as though a faint doubt had occurred to him as to the quality of his present happiness. Almost five years! There must have been moments even that afternoon when Daisy tumbled short of his dreams — not through her own fault, but because of the colossal vitality of his illusion. It had gone beyond her, beyond everything. He had thrown himself into it with a creative passion, adding to it all the time, decking it out with every bright feather that drifted his way. No amount of fire or freshness...
    Note: The Great Gatsby
  • Ben shared from Everything That Remains: A Memoir by The Minimalists by Joshua Fields Millburn, Ryan Nicodemus
    “Because old relationships are convenient, and starting new relationships is difficult—it requires work. But so does anything worth holding on to.” “But sometimes we hold on too long.” “Yep. We’ve all held on to someone who didn’t deserve to be there before. And most of us still have someone in our lives who continually drains us: Someone who isn’t supportive. Someone who takes and takes and takes without giving back to the relationship. Someone who contributes very little and prevents us from growing. Someone who constantly plays the victim.”
    Note: holding on to old relationships instead of establishiblishing new ones

Ben

(Tulsa, OK, United States)
Ben