About Benjamin D. Steele

I am: agnostic (somewhere between atheist and gnostic), have some mystical/spiritual leanings, Fortean, curious, questioning, open-minded, depressed, idealistic, pessimistic (philosophically and otherwise), cynical, critical, overly judgmental (sometimes to the point of being mean), deep, thoughtful, serious, intellectual (often get stuck in my own head), liberal (as a general attitude), not ideological (highly critical toward ideologues), compassionate (when I'm at my best, but I usually can muster at least empathy), understanding (as my Grandmother said, "Everyone is doing their best for where they're at in life."), a student of human nature (specifically in terms of psychology and culture which also includes philosophy and religion), darkly humorous (sometimes the dark overtakes the humor), weirdly imaginative (with emphasis on the weird), sometimes silly to the point of inanity

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Benjamin shared from Ned Ludd & Queen Mab: Machine-Breaking, Romanticism, and the Several Commons of 1811-12 (PM Pamphlet) by Peter Linebaugh
    What was quietly underground in one part of the world may erupt in fury in another part.
    Note: "What was quietly underground in one part of the world may erupt in fury in another part."
  • Benjamin shared from Ned Ludd & Queen Mab: Machine-Breaking, Romanticism, and the Several Commons of 1811-12 (PM Pamphlet) by Peter Linebaugh
    Tecumseh (1768–1813) confronted Governor Harrison in August 1810 with his famous speech about the commons when he said that the Indians considered “their lands as common property of the whole”—the basis of confederation. Denouncing land cessions, he exclaimed to Governor Harrison in Indiana, “Sell a country! Why not sell the air, the great sea, as well as the earth? Did not the Great Spirit make them all for the use of his children?”
    Note: "Sell a country! Why not sell the air, the great sea, as well as the earth?" ~ Tecumseh
  • Benjamin shared from Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous Than Others by James Gilligan
    And why do suicide and homicide rates parallel each other? The statistics, no matter how significant, fly in the face of common assumptions made about violent behavior.
    Note: "The statistics... fly in the face of common assumptions made about violent behavior."
  • Benjamin shared from Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous Than Others by James Gilligan
    Suicide and homicide increased when Republicans were in the White House and decreased under Democratic administrations, with a magnitude and consistency that could not be attributed to chance alone.
    Note: "Suicide and homicide increased when Republicans were in the White House and decreased under Dem..."
  • Benjamin shared from Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous Than Others by James Gilligan
    suicide and homicide rates tend to rise and fall together, which suggested the possibility that whatever was causing a rise in the one might be causing a rise in the other.
    Note: "suicide and homicide rates tend to rise and fall together"