About Benjamin D. Steele

I am: agnostic (somewhere between atheist and gnostic), have some mystical/spiritual leanings, Fortean, curious, questioning, open-minded, depressed, idealistic, pessimistic (philosophically and otherwise), cynical, critical, overly judgmental (sometimes to the point of being mean), deep, thoughtful, serious, intellectual (often get stuck in my own head), liberal (as a general attitude), not ideological (highly critical toward ideologues), compassionate (when I'm at my best, but I usually can muster at least empathy), understanding (as my Grandmother said, "Everyone is doing their best for where they're at in life."), a student of human nature (specifically in terms of psychology and culture which also includes philosophy and religion), darkly humorous (sometimes the dark overtakes the humor), weirdly imaginative (with emphasis on the weird), sometimes silly to the point of inanity

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Benjamin shared from Good White People (SUNY series, Philosophy and Race) by Shannon Sullivan
    White liberalism generally doesn’t aim to end white domination. Quite the opposite: it aims to render it more tolerable, both to its beneficiaries and its victims, and so to perpetuate itself indefinitely—an aim it shares with its “enemy” white supremacy.
    Note: "White liberalism generally doesn't aim to end white domination. Quite the opposite"
  • Benjamin shared from Good White People (SUNY series, Philosophy and Race) by Shannon Sullivan
    The white liberal and the white supremacist share the same root postulates. They are different in degree, not kind. —Lerone Bennett Jr., “Tea and Sympathy: Liberals and Other White Hopes”
    Note: "The white liberal and the white supremacist share the same root postulates."
  • Benjamin shared from Gentlemen Bootleggers: The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition, and a Small Town in Cahoots by Bryce T. Bauer
    Templeton was founded in a township known as Eden, in southern Carroll County, which was named after Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence. In their own ways both names, Eden and Carroll, were apt, providential.
    Note: "Carroll County [IA]...named after...the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence."
  • Benjamin shared from Gentlemen Bootleggers: The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition, and a Small Town in Cahoots by Bryce T. Bauer
    From its very beginning, Iowa was at the forefront, along with Kansas and Maine, of temperance activity in the nation. Several times before the state’s prohibition amendment, the legislature had enacted laws similarly banning alcohol. And several times those laws were either weakened or repealed as soon as the temperance activists let up in their crusade; even when they were in effect they did little, as they proved nearly impossible to enforce in the places where drinking was already ingrained in the culture. The goal with the amendment was to make the law considerably more difficult to repeal...
    Note: "Iowa was at the forefront, along with Kansas and Maine, of temperance activity in the nation."
  • Benjamin shared from Gentlemen Bootleggers: The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition, and a Small Town in Cahoots by Bryce T. Bauer
    Born in December 1899, he was just eleven months younger than Al Capone.
    Note: Many Prohibition bootleggers were Lost Generation 'ethnic' Americans.