About Benjamin D. Steele

I am: agnostic (somewhere between atheist and gnostic), have some mystical/spiritual leanings, Fortean, curious, questioning, open-minded, depressed, idealistic, pessimistic (philosophically and otherwise), cynical, critical, overly judgmental (sometimes to the point of being mean), deep, thoughtful, serious, intellectual (often get stuck in my own head), liberal (as a general attitude), not ideological (highly critical toward ideologues), compassionate (when I'm at my best, but I usually can muster at least empathy), understanding (as my Grandmother said, "Everyone is doing their best for where they're at in life."), a student of human nature (specifically in terms of psychology and culture which also includes philosophy and religion), darkly humorous (sometimes the dark overtakes the humor), weirdly imaginative (with emphasis on the weird), sometimes silly to the point of inanity

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Benjamin shared from Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress by Becky Pettit
    The promise of the civil rights era has been undercut by a new form of invisibility manufactured by mass incarceration and the prison-industrial complex. Yet the invisibility of large segments of the American population and the inequality it conceals is not a natural or inevitable product of prison growth.
    Note: "The promise of the civil rights era has been undercut by a new form of invisibility..."
  • Benjamin shared from Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress by Becky Pettit
    The intensive press coverage of America’s criminals and the extensive supervision of inmates by correctional authorities belie the invisibility of inmates, parolees, probationers, and others involved in the criminal justice system to the outside world. Inmates are a social group isolated socially, physically, and statistically from much of the rest of society. The vast majority of our nation’s inmates come from very few jurisdictions, and the facilities in which they are housed are even fewer in number
    Note: "Inmates are... isolated socially, physically, and statistically from much of the rest of society."
  • Benjamin shared from Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress by Becky Pettit
    Unabated press coverage of crime fuels fears of victimization and misperceptions about trends in crime. As a result, Americans have woefully inaccurate perceptions of their own risk of victimization and continue to believe that crime is on the upswing despite decades of declines in violent crime rates.
    Note: "Americans..believe that crime is on the upswing despite decades of declines in violent crime rates"
  • Benjamin shared from Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress by Becky Pettit
    The American prison system is both historically and comparatively unique. The United States now incarcerates a higher fraction of its population than at any other time in recorded history, and the United States leads the world in the percentage of its population held behind bars. Over one in one hundred American adults is living in a federal, state, or local prison or jail (Pew Research Center on the States 2008). If we include individuals on parole or probation, the numbers are even more startling. Nearly 5 million men and women are on probation, on parole, or under some form of community supervision....
    Note: "one in thirty-one American adults..over 3 percent..is under some form of correctional supervision"
  • Benjamin shared from Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress by Becky Pettit
    I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. —Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952)
    Note: "I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me." ~ Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man