About Bob Marshall

Organisational therapist specialising in knowledge-work organisations.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Bob shared from The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life by Jean Francois Revel, Matthieu Ricard
    Ricard can speak as he does because the one thesis for which there can be in principle no scientific evidence is the thesis that only scientific evidence counts.
    Note: Belief in Science is an act of Faith
  • Bob shared from The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life by Jean Francois Revel, Matthieu Ricard
    Let me call this secular Western philosophy of life the philosophy of enlightened self-interest. Most of us assume that there is ultimately no alternative to enlightened self-interest as a moral code just as we assume that there is no alternative to the scientific cosmology as a picture of how the world has come to be physically. And yet a widespread weariness, a malaise, lingers about that assumption, and the measure of this malaise is the sense of liberation that a significant minority experiences at the suggestion that the self, the object of all this enlightened interest, may be itself an...
    Note: Towards the decline of self-interest as a moral or philosophical imperative
  • Bob shared from The Monk and the Philosopher: A Father and Son Discuss the Meaning of Life by Jean Francois Revel, Matthieu Ricard
    “If not Jesus, Marx; and if neither Jesus nor Marx, then perhaps Buddha
    Note: On the rise of Buddhism in Eg France
  • Bob shared from The Theory of Moral Sentiments by Adam Smith
    That this is the source of our fellow-feeling for the misery of others, that it is by changing places in fancy with the sufferer, that we come either to conceive or to be affected by what he feels, may be demonstrated by many obvious observations, if it should not be thought sufficiently evident of itself. When we see a stroke aimed and just ready to fall upon the leg or arm of another person, we naturally shrink and draw back our own leg or our own arm; and when it does fall, we feel it in some measure, and are hurt by it as well as the sufferer.
    Note: Adam Smith writing about the Mirror Neuron effect
  • Bob shared from The Theory of Moral Sentiments by Adam Smith
    As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never inform us of what he suffers. They never did, and never can, carry us beyond our own person, and it is by the imagination only that we can form any conception of what are his sensations.
    Note: Adam Smith explaining empathy