Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Brian shared from 2 Second Lean - 2nd Edition: How to Grow People and Build a Fun Lean Culture by Paul A. Akers
    said, “Our goal is for everything to be struggle-free—or to have zero struggle in every activity.” A listener, Shannon, wrote, “Wow! That makes Lean so tangible.” The idea that every activity should have “zero struggle” or be “struggle-free” means in Lean terminology that there should be no: MURI = Burden or struggle MURA = Unevenness or variation MUDA = Waste which is the result of burden which produces unevenness or a lack of flow, which makes everything a struggle If you have no burden, then you will have evenness, which reduces waste, removes the struggle and lets value flow...
    Note: Love this Paul Akers @fastcap quote - "Zero struggle" sums up beautifully the goal of lean
  • Brian shared from 2 Second Lean - 2nd Edition: How to Grow People and Build a Fun Lean Culture by Paul A. Akers
    After the tour was over, one of the individuals said, “I want to know how we can implement Lean in the office.” I looked at him and asked, “Why? Are you in the office? I thought you said you were on the manufacturing floor.” He replied, “We are, but our office is so screwed up.” Then I said, “That is one of the biggest mistakes you’ll ever make in your whole life. Focus on you. Focus on eliminating your waste. Believe me. You have enough for ten lifetimes.” When people see how much your area has improved, how much easier your work is, how much more they can depend on you, how...
    Note: "Focus on you & eliminate your waste...you have enough for 10 lifetimes." @paulakers
  • Brian shared from Managing the Unexpected: Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty by Karl E. Weick, Kathleen M. Sutcliffe
    less simplification allows you to see more. HROs take deliberate steps to create more complete and nuanced pictures of what they face and who they are as they face it. Knowing that the world they face is complex, unstable, unknowable, and unpredictable, HROs position themselves to see as much as possible. They welcome diverse experience, skepticism toward received wisdom, and negotiating tactics that reconcile differences of opinion without destroying the nuances that diverse people detect.
    Note: HROs realize powerful #gemba lesson - reality is more nuanced than any dashboard!
  • Brian shared from Managing the Unexpected: Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty by Karl E. Weick, Kathleen M. Sutcliffe
    A one-inch band of fire that produces $1 billion in damage is a classic pattern in unexpected events. Small events have large consequences. Small discrepancies give off small clues that are hard to spot but easy to treat if they are spotted. When clues become much more visible, they are that much harder to treat. Managing the unexpected often means that people have to make strong responses to weak signals, something that is counterintuitive and not very “heroic.”
    Note: Great reason for developing a #kaizen culture. Address small issues before they ever get big!
  • Brian shared from Taiichi Ohnos Workplace Management: Special 100th Birthday Edition by Taiichi Ohno
    This revolution of awareness will become exceedingly important. Without it, we are at risk of being happy with achieving only an improvement of 10 percent or 20 percent of productivity as a linear extension of our current ways.
    Note: Great Ohno quote about how we need a revolution of awareness.
(Seattle, WA USA)
Brian R. Buck