About Chris Oestereich

Papa. Food Security advocate. People/Idea agglomerator. Humanist. Optimistic malcontent. Climatehawk.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Chris shared from The Great Disruption by Paul Gilding
    E. F. Schumacher argued in his seminal book Small Is Beautiful, describing what he called Buddhist economics: “A Buddhist economist would consider this approach excessively irrational: since consumption is merely a means to human well-being, the aim should be to obtain the maximum of well-being with the minimum of consumption.… The less toil there is, the more time and strength is left for artistic creativity.
    Note: Don't know much about history...
  • Chris shared from The Haves and the Have-Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality by Branko Milanovic
    Can a globalized world, where capital, goods, ideas, and information travel without impediment, coexist with a world where humans cannot move?
    Note: Not for long.
  • Chris shared from The Haves and the Have-Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality by Branko Milanovic
    let’s put this in the context where we look at absolute income levels. In the year 2007, India’s GDP per capita was $PPP 2,600, China’s $PPP 5,050, and the United States’ $PPP 43,200. The absolute differences are enormous. So it should be no surprise, despite their countries’ fast growth, that we shall find a very small percentage of Indians and Chinese whose incomes compare with the real incomes of middle-class Americans or West Europeans
    Note: Nowhere near equilibrium.
  • Chris shared from The Haves and the Have-Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality by Branko Milanovic
    Today, the ratio between the richest and the poorest has increased to more than one hundred to one. Even the ratio between Great Britain (which is no longer the richest country in the world) and China (despite its spectacular economic growth during the past thirty years) is now six to one, double what it was two centuries ago.
    Note: Broken.
  • Chris shared from The Haves and the Have-Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality by Branko Milanovic
    You knew that if a larger share of the pie were to accrue to capitalists, total inequality among persons was very likely to go up. And the reverse was true with wages.
    Note: Sweet clarity.
(Boise, ID United States)
Chris Oestereich