About Chris Oestereich

Radical Intrapreneur. Incorrigible, optimistic malcontent. Here to help. #sustainability #inequality #wickedproblems

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Chris shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    Inequalities with respect to labor usually seem mild, moderate, and almost reasonable (to the extent that inequality can be reasonable—this point should not be overstated). In comparison, inequalities with respect to capital are always extreme.
  • Chris shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    The first regularity we observe when we try to measure income inequality in practice is that inequality with respect to capital is always greater than inequality with respect to labor. The distribution of capital ownership (and of income from capital) is always more concentrated than the distribution of income from labor.
  • Chris shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    Progress toward economic and technological rationality need not imply progress toward democratic and meritocratic rationality. The primary reason for this is simple: technology, like the market, has neither limits nor morality.
  • Chris shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    it is also possible that technological changes over the very long run will slightly favor human labor over capital, thus lowering the return on capital and the capital share. But the size of this long-term effect seems limited, and it is possible that it will be more than compensated by other forces tending in the opposite direction, such as the creation of increasingly sophisticated systems of financial intermediation and international competition for capital.
  • Chris shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    The dynamic inconsistency that Marx pointed out thus corresponds to a real difficulty, from which the only logical exit is structural growth, which is the only way of balancing the process of capital accumulation (to a certain extent). Only permanent growth of productivity and population can compensate for the permanent addition of new units of capital, as the law β = s / g makes clear. Otherwise, capitalists do indeed dig their own grave: either they tear each other apart in a desperate attempt to combat the falling rate of profit (for instance, by waging war over the best colonial investments,...
    Note: At what point revolution?
(Boise, ID United States)
Chris Oestereich