Public Notes


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  • Christer shared from Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder
    On any given day in the second half of 1941, the Germans shot more Jews than had been killed by pogroms in the entire history of the Russian Empire.
    Note: german progrom
  • Christer shared from Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder
    On any given day in the second half of 1941, the Germans shot more Jews than had been killed by pogroms in the entire history of the Russian Empire.
    Note: german progrom
  • Christer shared from Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder
    The Soviet Union was both a state and a vision, both a domestic political system and an internationalist ideology. Its foreign policy was always domestic policy, and its domestic policy was always foreign policy. That was its strength and its weakness.35
    Note: soviet state
  • Christer shared from a Personal Document
    “fulfilled the idea that gradually developed in the war—that the scale and nature of operations required a ‘big business’ type of commander, a great constructing and organizing brain.”
    Note: Meyer
  • Christer shared from a Personal Document
    It was at Hamel that Monash showed what he could do. He used his organizational genius and experience in the management of huge projects to integrate as never before all the terrible new machinery of war: machine guns, artillery, aircraft, and tanks. Executing Monash’s plan of attack, his troops needed only ninety-three minutes to reach all their objectives, capturing thousands of enemy soldiers and suffering only light casualties, making Amiens secure and opening a way for further Allied offensives.
    Note: Meyer
  • Christer shared from a Personal Document
    Many of them, when they attacked, would not even be using their rifles, which would be slung behind them across their backs. They would be on the run, in the tiny groups that the new doctrine prescribed. They would make use of whatever cover they could find, scrambling to keep pace with the creeping barrage that was their shield. When they encountered enemy troops, they would hurl grenades or lay down a field of fire with the light machine guns that some of them carried—whatever it took to keep moving. They had colored flares with which to signal success or trouble, a need for artillery support...
    Note: Meyer