About Christopher T. Miller

Chris Miller is a software developer by trade and a writer by necessity. Most of his major achievements have been some combination of these two things. He has not yet been eaten by a grue.

Recent Activity

  • Christopher shared from Use of Weapons (A Culture Novel Book 3) by Iain M. Banks
    “Tell me, what is happiness?” “Happiness? Happiness . . . is to wake up, on a bright spring morning, after an exhausting first night spent with a beautiful . . . passionate . . . multi-murderess.” “. . . Shit, is that all?”
    Note: Reminds me of something @MattFnWallace would write...
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    The more I made room in my life for absence, for solitude, for silence, the more I had time for my memories.
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    “Televisions and computers,” says Gentile, “are crutches for your attention. And the more time you spend on those crutches, the less able you are to walk by yourself.”
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    Our devotion to the new authenticity of digital experience—the realness of the patently incorporeal—becomes painfully apparent in moments of technological failure. Wi-Fi dies at a café and a fleet of bloggers will choke as though the oxygen level just dropped.
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    When we step away from earlier, “more authentic” relations, it makes sense that we also fetishize the earlier “real.” Sherry Turkle argues that, in fact, our culture of electronic simulation has so enamored us that the very idea of authenticity is “for us what sex was for the Victorians—threat and obsession, taboo and fascination.”
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    Without absence in our lives, we risk fooling ourselves into believing that things (a message from a lover, the performance of a song, the face of a human body) matter less.
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    The most obvious reason a person would ditch the authentic is, of course, to gain access to a heightened version of dull reality. Enter the promise and wonder of Google Glass, released in 2013, which offers just that—augmented reality. The “wearable computer” is a (slightly futuristic, slightly dorky) headset fixed with a miniature display and camera, which responds to voice commands. We can tell it to take a picture of what we’re looking at or simply pull up Google Images’ archive of vintage Hulk Hogan photos because we want to compare the hairdo being sported by that guy on the metro....
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    There has always been an abundance of bullshit. But never before have so many been implicated in the bullshit rigmarole that is public conversation. Before, most of us could point at the bullshitters among us (the politicians and hotheaded pundits) and shake our heads. Today, no such finger-pointing can be allowed because we all swim in the mess. When the armchair philosophers are handed megaphones and the crowd of “honest opinion” starts to overwhelm the trained few, will we begin to think that bullshitting is the only and the natural way to make a call?
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    We get mob opinion instead of singular voices; crowdsourced culture. Consider the Unbound Publishing project, which democratizes the selection of which books get written. Authors pitch ideas to users, who then choose whether or not to fund the writing of said books. “Books are now in your hands,” enthuses the Web site. This sounds like a splendid way to produce top-rate Twilight porn (and I tip my hat to the creators of such best sellers), but what is the spectrum of books that such an approach will produce, and what sort does it cancel out?
  • Christopher shared from The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection by Michael Harris
    We need to insist on a certain randomness, and a large degree of pure, haphazard discovery, in the tools we use to explore our world. The