About Christopher T. Miller

Chris Miller is a software developer by trade and a writer by necessity. Most of his major achievements have been some combination of these two things. He has not yet been eaten by a grue.

Recent Activity

  • Christopher shared from Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation by Michael Pollan
    In ancient Greece, the word for “cook,” “butcher,” and “priest” was the same—mageiros—and the word shares an etymological root with “magic.”
  • Christopher shared from Chronicles of the Black Company by Glen Cook
    There were prodigies and portents enough, One-Eye says. We must blame ourselves for misinterpreting them. One-Eye’s handicap in no way impairs his marvelous hindsight.
  • Christopher shared from Consider Phlebas (Culture) by Iain M. Banks
    “Empathize with stupidity and you’re halfway to thinking like an idiot,”
  • Christopher shared from Clutterfree with Kids: Change your thinking. Discover new habits. Free your home. by Joshua Becker
    Minimalism is freedom from the modern rush. Our world lives at a feverish pace. We are too hurried, too frenzied, and too stressed. We work long, passionate hours to pay the bills, but fall deeper into debt. We rush from one activity to another—multitasking along the way—but never seem to get everything done. We remain in constant connection with others through our cell phones, but true life-changing relationships continue to allude us. Minimalism slows down life and frees us from this modern hysteria to live faster. It finds freedom to disengage. It seeks to remove the frivolous and keep...
  • Christopher shared from Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business by Neil Postman
    the clearest way to see through a culture is to attend to its tools for conversation.
  • Christopher shared from Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business by Neil Postman
    We are all, as Huxley says someplace, Great Abbreviators, meaning that none of us has the wit to know the whole truth, the time to tell it if we believed we did, or an audience so gullible as to accept it.
  • Christopher shared from The Way of Men by Jack Donovan
    I have come to the conclusion that the lot of man is to find a balance between the domestic world of comfort and the world of manly strife. Men cannot be men—much less good or heroic men—unless their actions have meaningful consequences to people they truly care about. Strength requires an opposing force, courage requires risk, mastery requires hard work, honor requires accountability to other men. Without these things, we are little more than boys playing at being men, and there is no weekend retreat or mantra or half-assed rite of passage that can change that.
  • Christopher shared from The Way of Men by Jack Donovan
    The goal of civilization seems to be to eliminate work and risk, but the world has changed more than we have. Our bodies crave work and sex, our minds crave risk and conflict.
  • Christopher shared from The Way of Men by Jack Donovan
    A man who is more concerned with being a good man than being good at being a man makes a very well-behaved slave.
  • Christopher shared from The Way of Men by Jack Donovan
    Women believe they can improve men by making masculinity about what women want from men. Men want women to want them, but female approval isn’t the only thing men care about. When men compete against each other for status, they are competing for each other’s approval. The women whom men find most desirable have historically been attracted to—or been claimed by—men who were feared or revered by other men. Female approval has regularly been a consequence of male approval.