Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • DJL shared from Who Owns The Future? by Jaron Lanier
    We want free online experiences so badly that we are happy to not be paid for information that comes from us now or ever. That sensibility also implies that the more dominant information becomes in our economy, the less most of us will be worth.
  • DJL shared from Who Owns The Future? by Jaron Lanier
    the dominant principle of the new economy, the information economy, has lately been to conceal the value of information,
  • DJL shared from Who Owns The Future? by Jaron Lanier
    it has become commonplace to expect online services (not just news, but 21st century treats like search or social networking) to be given for free, or rather, in exchange for acquiescence to being spied on.
  • DJL shared from Who Owns The Future? by Jaron Lanier
    An amazing number of people offer an amazing amount of value over networks. But the lion’s share of wealth now flows to those who aggregate and route those offerings, rather than those who provide the ‘raw materials.’
  • DJL shared from Who Owns The Future? by Jaron Lanier
    Networks need a great number of people to participate in them to generate significant value. But when they do, only a small number of people get paid. That has the net effect of centralizing wealth and limiting overall economic growth.
  • DJL shared from Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age by Cory Doctorow
    content-blocking and surveillance are the province of book burners and censors, not creators and publishers. We have fought for generations for the freedom of conscience necessary to have a robust intellectual and creative sphere. Our forebears risked jail, violence, even death for these freedoms. We owe it to them—and to our children—to pledge ourselves anew to these values in the era of the Internet.
  • DJL shared from Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age by Cory Doctorow
    The Internet era has conjured forth mountains of nonsense about the death of copyright. Reformers have claimed that copyright is dead because the Internet makes it impossible to control who copies what; copyright supporters have said that the Internet itself must be contained, to head off that grim fate. This is rubbish.
  • DJL shared from Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age by Cory Doctorow
    Simple math tells us that only a fraction of YouTube can possibly consist of directly infringing clips, uploaded for the sole purpose of helping people see and hear otherwise expensive things for free.
  • DJL shared from Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age by Cory Doctorow
    A common tactic in discussions about the Internet as a free-speech medium is to discount Internet discourse as inherently trivial.
  • DJL shared from Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age by Cory Doctorow
    Information doesn’t want to be free—people do.

DJL

DJL