About David Bridgeland

Author, consultant, etc.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • David shared from The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
    Von Neumann loved telling jokes and reciting risqué limericks in various languages at his parties, and he ate so heartily that his wife once said he could count anything except calories. He drove cars with an abandon that was reckless but not always wreckless, and he was fond of flashy new Cadillacs. “He bought a new one at least once a year, whether he had wrecked the previous one or not,” wrote the science historian George Dyson.46
    Note: Von Neumann bought a new Cadillac every year, whether hehad wrecked the old one or not
  • David shared from The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
    “We had to learn their vocabularies in order to be able to run their problems. I could switch my vocabulary and speak highly technical for the programmers, and then tell the same things to the managers a few hours later but with a totally different vocabulary.” Innovation requires articulation.
    Note: innovation requires articulation
  • David shared from Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original by Robin Kelley
    Monk had no playlist, and Rouse never knew what his new boss was going to play until he started playing it: “The first chorus might sound like spaghetti until I got it. He didn’t stop though, he just kept going.”94
    Note: figuring it out on-the-fly
  • David shared from The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace by H.W. Brands
    He added, sagely but counterintuitively: “I know no method to secure the repeal of bad or obnoxious laws so effective as their stringent execution.”
    Note: president-elect grant
  • David shared from The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die by Niall Ferguson
    are the glorious privileges of liberty’: that was the formulation of ‘Cato’ (the nom de plume of John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon), writing in the early 1720s. Third, mind your own bloody business. ‘The taste for making others submit to a way of life which one thinks more useful for them than they do themselves’, John Stuart Mill explained to the French liberal Alexis de Tocqueville, ‘is not a common taste in England.’4
    Note: the rest of the quote.
(Sterling, VA USA)
David Bridgeland