About David Bridgeland

Author, consultant, etc.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • David shared from The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace by H.W. Brands
    He added, sagely but counterintuitively: “I know no method to secure the repeal of bad or obnoxious laws so effective as their stringent execution.”
    Note: president-elect grant
  • David shared from The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die by Niall Ferguson
    are the glorious privileges of liberty’: that was the formulation of ‘Cato’ (the nom de plume of John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon), writing in the early 1720s. Third, mind your own bloody business. ‘The taste for making others submit to a way of life which one thinks more useful for them than they do themselves’, John Stuart Mill explained to the French liberal Alexis de Tocqueville, ‘is not a common taste in England.’4
    Note: the rest of the quote.
  • David shared from The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die by Niall Ferguson
    My undergraduate reading at Oxford persuaded me that the real point of English history was to establish, for the first time, three sacred principles. First, an Englishman’s home is his castle. In the case of Entick v. Carrington, Lord Camden ruled against the government for raiding the home of the radical journalist John Entick. ‘The great end for which men entered into society was to secure their property,’ declared Camden, quoting John Locke. ‘By the laws of England, every invasion of private property, be it ever so minute, is a trespass.’ Secondly, do what you like as long as you...
    Note: English values
  • David shared from The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. Reinertsen
    There are many different types of queueing processes, but we can gain enormous insight by looking at one of the simplest of queues, what is called an M/M/1/∞ (infinite) queue.
    Note: M/M/1/infinite
  • David shared from The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. Reinertsen
    In fact, economics would suggest that the 96 percent failure rate tells us more about the asymmetry of payoffs from product development than it does about our management competence. When we make much more money from success than we lose from failure, then we should be willing to invest in opportunities that have considerably less than a 50 percent chance of success. This problem appears to be better understood by economists than by observers of product development.
    Note: !!
  • David shared from The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. Reinertsen
    The anticipated demand level that optimizes expected profits is known as the “critical fractile.”
    Note: the critical fractile
  • David shared from The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. Reinertsen
    Today’s development organizations are managed like centrally-controlled economies of the twentieth century. Resource is allocated by an infinitely wise centralized decision maker.
    Note: the marxist underpinnigs of software development, as practiced
  • David shared from The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. Reinertsen
    Some companies worry that imperfect economic frameworks will lead workers to make bad decisions. They act as if the absence of these frameworks will magically protect them from bad decisions. Sadly, the lack of an economic framework does not prevent people from making economic decisions. It simply causes these decisions to be driven underground and to be based on intuition instead of analysis.
    Note: common situation: approximate models are much better than no models
  • David shared from The Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. Reinertsen
    I used to think that sensible and compelling new ideas would be adopted quickly. Today, I believe this view is hopelessly naive. After all, it took 40 years before we recognized the power of the Toyota Production System.
    Note: true, and amazing. Why did it take so long?
  • David shared from The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses by Eric Ries
    Such thought experiments were extremely disturbing to me because they undermined my job description.
    Note: Thoughts that undermine your own job description are always disturbing
(Sterling, VA USA)
David Bridgeland