About David Bridgeland

Author, consultant, etc.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    He felt as if he had received, and accepted, a proposal of marriage from an unexpected but infinitely desirable suitor, and knew that France, the bride chosen for him by parentage and blood, France with whom a marriage had been arranged on the day of his birth, might never forgive him for leaving her at the altar.
    Note: another perfect sentence
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    If it were not subversive to say that Elasticnagar was a dump then he would have said that it was a dump. But it could not be a dump because it was Elasticnagar and so by definition and by law and so on and so forth. He went into a corner of his mind, a small subversive corner that didn’t exist because it shouldn’t, and he whispered into his cupped hands. Elasticnagar was a dump.
    Note: !!
  • David shared from Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of How the Wildest Man in Congress and a Rogue CIA Agent Changed the History by George Crile
    He also realized that once again there was a silver lining in the Iran-Contra disaster. Rarely can the government and the press handle more than one great scandal at a time. The Contra war had always been a heavensent distraction, and once again congressional staffers, reporters, and politicians were climbing all over the supposedly covert Nicaraguan operation. Meanwhile, in Afghanistan it was a completely free ride.
    Note: one scandal at a time
  • David shared from Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of How the Wildest Man in Congress and a Rogue CIA Agent Changed the History by George Crile
    It showed that the mujahideen were hurting the Russians and that they were unwilling to quit. Gust knew that if he gave these reports a high enough classification, they’d be sure to leak—which was his intention.
    Note: security as publicity
  • David shared from Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of How the Wildest Man in Congress and a Rogue CIA Agent Changed the History by George Crile
    Technically, Avrakotos was in London to consult with a coequal intelligence service, but during this visit he realized he had something that these able and ambitious British spies desperately needed. With his American money he could put them back in the game. They had something equally valuable to offer Avrakotos in return—no lawyers to contend with and, as Gust enviously put it, “a prime minister to the right of Attila the Hun.”
    Note: US money, British freedom
  • David shared from The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves by W. Brian Arthur
    Modularity, we can say, is to a technological economy what the division of labor is to a manufacturing one; it increases as given technologies are used more, and therefore as the economy expands. Or, to express the same thing in good Smithian language, the partition of technologies increases with the extent of the market.
    Note: tech modularity as smithian division of labor
  • David shared from The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves by W. Brian Arthur
    I will call this mechanism evolution by combination, or more succinctly, combinatorial evolution.
    Note: combinatorial evolution
  • David shared from The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves by W. Brian Arthur
    Our deepest hope as humans lies in technology; but our deepest trust lies in nature. These forces are like tectonic plates grinding inexorably into each other in one long, slow collision.
    Note: hope versus trust
  • David shared from The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves by W. Brian Arthur
    I puzzled why historians of all people had the most to say about the ways and essence of technology and its innovation. Later it came to me that a great deal more of the world emerges from its technologies than from its wars and treaties, and historians are naturally interested in how the world has formed itself.
    Note: historians know the most about technology ?
  • David shared from The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson
    Von Neumann loved telling jokes and reciting risqué limericks in various languages at his parties, and he ate so heartily that his wife once said he could count anything except calories. He drove cars with an abandon that was reckless but not always wreckless, and he was fond of flashy new Cadillacs. “He bought a new one at least once a year, whether he had wrecked the previous one or not,” wrote the science historian George Dyson.46
    Note: Von Neumann bought a new Cadillac every year, whether hehad wrecked the old one or not
(Sterling, VA USA)
David Bridgeland