About David Bridgeland

Entrepreneur, modeler, etc.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    Maybe that was it, but I really can’t be sure. We are mysteries to ourselves. We don’t know why we do things, why we fall in love or commit murder or throw a stone at a sheet of glass.”
    Note: we are mysteries to ourselves
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    Marriage now is what, car rental. Thank you for using our service, we’ll pick you up, when you’re done with the vehicle we’ll take you home again. Get all the insurance you can get up front, loss damage waiver, whatever, and the risk is nothing. You crash the car, you walk away without nothing to pay. Go for it, baby, who you gonna save it for? They don’t make no glass slippers no more. They already closed the factory. They don’t make no princes neither. They shot the Romanovs in a cellar and Anastasia too is dead.”
    Note: marriage now is car rental @salmanrushdie
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    The beautiful came to this city in huge pathetic herds, to suffer, to be humiliated, to see the powerful currency of their beauty devalued like the Russian ruble or Argentine peso; to work as bellhops, as bar hostesses, as garbage collectors, as maids. The city was a cliff and they were its stampeding lemmings. At the foot of the cliff was the valley of the broken dolls.
    Note: los angles and the tragedy of the beautiful
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    Once or twice, in tones of sorrow, he spoke about the power of life’s violent blows and slow agonies to divert a good person from his or her natural path, just as dynamite or erosion can—dramatically or gradually—change the course of a river, and in these speeches he might have been talking about Margaret, but he might also have been describing himself.
    Note: the power of life's violent blows and slow agonies
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    Where was justice? Shouldn’t justice be done? Where were the forces of justice, where was the Justice League, why weren’t superheroes swooping down out of the sky to bring her father’s murderer to justice?
    Note: where was the Justice League?
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    Of late, America had been infected by a Western strain of the South Asian disease of acronymial initialitis. JFK, RFK, MLK, and POTUS of course was LBJ and UNSGUT was the secretary-general of the United Nations, U Thant. The ugliness of the bureaucratic terminology, its aggressive uninterest in euphony, marked it out as power-speech. Power had no need for prettification, no need to make things easy. By showing its contempt for verbal felicity it revealed itself as itself, naked and unadorned. The iron fist took off the velvet glove.
    Note: acronyms and power @salmanrushdie
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    He felt as if he had received, and accepted, a proposal of marriage from an unexpected but infinitely desirable suitor, and knew that France, the bride chosen for him by parentage and blood, France with whom a marriage had been arranged on the day of his birth, might never forgive him for leaving her at the altar.
    Note: another perfect sentence
  • David shared from Shalimar the Clown: A Novel by Salman Rushdie
    If it were not subversive to say that Elasticnagar was a dump then he would have said that it was a dump. But it could not be a dump because it was Elasticnagar and so by definition and by law and so on and so forth. He went into a corner of his mind, a small subversive corner that didn’t exist because it shouldn’t, and he whispered into his cupped hands. Elasticnagar was a dump.
    Note: !!
  • David shared from Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of How the Wildest Man in Congress and a Rogue CIA Agent Changed the History by George Crile
    He also realized that once again there was a silver lining in the Iran-Contra disaster. Rarely can the government and the press handle more than one great scandal at a time. The Contra war had always been a heavensent distraction, and once again congressional staffers, reporters, and politicians were climbing all over the supposedly covert Nicaraguan operation. Meanwhile, in Afghanistan it was a completely free ride.
    Note: one scandal at a time
  • David shared from Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of How the Wildest Man in Congress and a Rogue CIA Agent Changed the History by George Crile
    It showed that the mujahideen were hurting the Russians and that they were unwilling to quit. Gust knew that if he gave these reports a high enough classification, they’d be sure to leak—which was his intention.
    Note: security as publicity
(Sterling, VA USA)
David Bridgeland
Web Page: hangingsteel.com