Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • David shared from Two Views on Women in Ministry (Counterpoints: Bible and Theology) by James R. Beck
    Women are singled out in the early church as apostles (Rom. 16:7), prophets (Acts 21:9; 1 Cor. 11:5), evangelists (Phil. 4:2–3), patrons (Rom. 16:2), teachers (Acts 18:24–26; Titus 2:3– 5), deacons (Rom. 16:1; 1 Tim. 3:11), prayer leaders (1 Cor. 11:5), overseers of house churches (Acts 12:12; 16:14–15; Col. 4:15), prayer warriors (1 Tim. 5:5), and those who were known for their mercy and hospitality (5:10).
    Note: Did you know women took on these roles in the New Testament?
  • David shared from Faith Unraveled: How a Girl Who Knew All the Answers Learned to Ask Questions by Rachel Held Evans
    Jesus drank wine with sexual deviants. He committed major social taboos. He spent a lot of time among contagious people, crazy people, uneducated people, and smelly people. His famous cousin wore camel hair and ate locusts and honey. Those most familiar with Scripture called his views heretical, and his own family questioned his sanity. Jesus introduced new teachings not found in the Scriptures and claimed his authority came directly from God. He asked his disciples to sell all their “blessings” and follow him, when doing so could get them excommunicated from the faith or even killed. He was...
    Note: Why many of us probably would have been a part of the "I Hate Jesus" club if we lived in the first century.
  • David shared from Faith Unraveled: How a Girl Who Knew All the Answers Learned to Ask Questions by Rachel Held Evans
    Isaiah 55 provides an entirely different framework for thinking about God’s justice, because it suggests that we have it backward — the mystery lies not in God’s unfathomable wrath but in his unfathomable mercy. God’s ways are higher than our ways because his capacity to love is infinitely greater than our own. Despite all that we do to alienate ourselves from God, all that we do to insult and disobey, God abundantly pardons again and again.
    Note: Mercy is greater than wrath...
  • David shared from Jesus Is Lord, Caesar Is Not: Evaluating Empire in New Testament Studies by Scot McKnight, Joseph B. Modica
    The Greek word kyrios (Lord), commonly used for a Roman emperor, is not used by Mark as an explicit title for Jesus. Mark is the only writer of the four Gospels that avoids this title for Jesus. The title “Lord” was used for the Emperor Nero (Nero kyrios); so, it may have been advantageous not to employ such a title for Jesus. Josephus relates that when Vespasian returned to Rome, he was hailed as “their Benefactor and Savior.”[16] Mark never entitles Jesus as “Savior,” although he does imply that Jesus, and not a human emperor, “saves” (Mk 5:23, 28, 34; 6:56; 10:26, 52; 13:13; 15:30-31).
    Note: NERO KYRIOS & THE BOOK OF MARK
  • David shared from Jesus Is Lord, Caesar Is Not: Evaluating Empire in New Testament Studies by Scot McKnight, Joseph B. Modica
    Generally, Christians were accused of the same charge of atheism that was directed at the Jews because they believed in an invisible God.
    Note: Who were the 1st century "atheists" within the Roman Empire?
(Tyler, TX, US)
David George Montalvo
Web Page: DavidGeorge.tv