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  • David shared from 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy (American Philosophy) by John J Stuhr
    Regarding Diogenes' impudent response, Sloterdijk remarks: "It demonstrates in one stroke what antiquity understands by philosophical wisdom-not so much a theoretical knowledge but rather an unerring sovereign spirit.... [T]he wise man ... turns his back on the subjective principle of power, ambition, and the urge to be recognized. He is the first one who is uninhibited enough to say the truth to the prince. Diogenes' answer negates not only the desire for power, but the power of desire as such."53
  • David shared from 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy (American Philosophy) by John J Stuhr
    "We have grown literally afraid to be poor. We despise anyone who elects to be poor in order to simplify and save his inner life.... We have lost the power even of imagining what the ancient idealization of poverty could have meant," he says, and then goes on to enumerate its meanings as if he is describing Diogenes: "the liberation from material attachments, the unbribed soul, the manlier indifference, the paying our way by what we are or do and not by what we have, the right to fling away our life at any moment irresponsibly" (VRE, 289, 293).
  • David shared from 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy (American Philosophy) by John J Stuhr
    Diogenes' rude riposte to Alexander no doubt delighted William James, not least because it speaks directly to what in The Varieties of Religious Experience he calls "the value of saintliness." He associates the freedom from desire and power with a saintly virtue that he seeks to "rehabilitate" as a live moral option in contemporary life. Asceticism, James urges, should become synonymous with the "strenuous life" reconceived as an embrace of poverty rather than "wealth-getting."
  • David shared from The Bicycle in Wartime: An Illustrated History (Second edition) by Jim Fitzpatrick
    And, short of nuclear weapons, the second phase would witness the application of the most sophisticated military technology yet devised, see the helicopter gunship come of age, and experience the greatest concentration of explosive power ever delivered. But in the end the victors were still using bicycles, as they were in the beginning.
  • David shared from The Bicycle in Wartime: An Illustrated History (Second edition) by Jim Fitzpatrick
    If the history of military cycling teaches us anything, it is not only that obsolescence and usefulness lie in the eyes of the beholder, but that some see niches where others do not.
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David Wen Riccardi-Zhu
Web Page: http://dwrz.net