Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • David shared from a Personal Document
    It can also be helpful to work in different places. Instead of being chained to your desk all day, make a point of moving around. In a typical day I might spend time working in my apartment, the local library, and at a nearby coffee shop. Each time I move to a new location the change in scenery refreshes me and increases my motivation to work.
  • David shared from a Personal Document
    When you sit down to work without a plan, it’s easy to get caught up in crutch activities like checking email and browsing the web. Without a purpose, your mind will be pulled in several different directions. Instead of devoting all your attention to one important task, you’ll find yourself distracted by a variety of nagging thoughts. To avoid this, make a clear plan of action beforehand. If you need to check email, resolve to fire through it as quickly as possible, then close your inbox and move on to your most important task. I like to use a morning run or walk to form my action plan for...
  • David shared from The Great Movies by Roger Ebert
    Watching many movies, I realize that all of the dialogue is entirely devoted to explaining or furthering the plot, and no joy is taken in the style of language and idiom for its own sake. There is not a single line in Pearl Harbor you would want to quote with anything but derision. Most conversations in most movies are deadly boring—which is why directors with no gift for dialogue depend so heavily on action and special effects. The characters in Pulp Fiction are always talking, and always interesting, funny, scary, or audacious. This movie would work as an audio book. Imagine having to listen...
  • David shared from The Great Movies by Roger Ebert
    But it isn’t the structure that makes Pulp Fiction a great film. Its greatness comes from its marriage of original characters (essentially comic) with a series of vivid and half-fanciful events—and from the dialogue. The dialogue is the foundation of everything else.
  • David shared from The Great Movies by Roger Ebert
    I saw Pulp Fiction for the first time at the Cannes Film Festival in 1994; it went on to win the Palme d’Or and to dominate the national conversation about film for at least the next twelve months. It is the most influential film of the decade; its circular timeline can be sensed in films as different as The Usual Suspects, The Zero Effect, and Memento—not that they copied it, but that they were aware of the pleasures of toying with chronology.
(Cambridge, MA, United States)
David