About Edward Kless

Ed Kless is the senior director of partner development and strategy for Sage Business Solutions. He is a frequent contributor to industry publications, including the Journal of Accountancy and Harvard Business Review, and has spoken at many conferences worldwide on project management, pricing, and knowledge workers. A senior fellow at the VeraSage Institute, he lives north of Dallas with his wife and two children and ran for Texas State Senate in 2010.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    I’ve looked in history for heroes who became heroes for what they did not do, but it is hard to observe nonaction; I could not easily find any.
    Note: Where are the anti heros? Those that did the right amount of nothing.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Modernity starts with the state monopoly on violence, and ends with the state’s monopoly on fiscal irresponsibility.
    Note: Sorry, I have to share this, even though I just shared a quote a few minutes ago.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Although the stated intention of political leaders and economic policy makers is to stabilize the system by inhibiting fluctuations, the result tends to be the opposite.
    Note: So true.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Alessandro Pluchino and his colleagues showed how adding a certain number of randomly selected politicians to the process can improve the functioning of the parliamentary system.
    Note: Perhaps this is needed in a new Constitution, a form of super jury duty, called legislative duty, where one-third or so of the legislature should be choose at random from the citizenry.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    The Europeans, thanks to the centralization of (some) power with the European Commission in Brussels, are quickly discovering the existence of these mutants coming to manipulate democracy for the sake of some large corporation. By influencing one single decision or regulation in Brussels, a single lobbyist gets a large bang. It is a much larger payoff (at low cost) than with municipalities, which would require armies of lobbyists trying to convince people while embedded in their communities.3
    Note: Great example of why government need to be smaller and decentralized.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Finally, a thought. He who has never sinned is less reliable than he who has only sinned once. And someone who has made plenty of errors—though never the same error more than once—is more reliable than someone who has never made any.
    Note: Great restatement of learning from mistakes, and sins.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    apophatic
    Note: Good word.
  • Edward shared from Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    If you see fraud and do not say fraud, you are a fraud. Just as being nice to the arrogant is no better than being arrogant toward the nice, being accommodating toward anyone committing a nefarious action condones it.
    Note: Simple, but excellent rule.
  • Edward shared from Human Action (NONE) by Ludwig von Mises
    pleonastic
    Note: I love coming across new words.
  • Edward shared from Human Action (NONE) by Ludwig von Mises
    Nobody is in a position to decree what should make a fellow man happier.
    Note: This is a tough read, but so far, I am loving Mises' Human Action.
(Allen, Texas, United States)
Edward Kless
Web Page: edkless.com