About Elizabeth Drescher

I am an educator, scholar, writer and speaker on Christian spirituality, with an emphasis on the spiritual practices of ordinary believers and seekers today and in the past. My book Tweet If You Heart Jesus: Practicing Church in the Digital Reformation (Morehouse, 2011) explores the relationship between new digital media and the rich traditions of the Church. I teach religion and pastoral ministry at Santa Clara University and I write for the online magazine Religion Dispatches. My writing has been highlighted by the Atlantic Monthly, the BBC, and National Public Radio.

I am a native of Western Pennsylvania, and I currently live with my family in the sunny Silicon Valley.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Elizabeth shared from Net Smart by Howard Rheingold, Anthony Weeks
    You can’t make microdecisions about how to deploy your attention in the moment unless you have made macrodecisions about how you want to spend your time.
    Note: Digital fundamental option, for #Catholics, some #Anglicans...
  • Elizabeth shared from Net Smart by Howard Rheingold, Anthony Weeks
    You can’t make microdecisions about how to deploy your attention in the moment unless you have made macrodecisions about how you want to spend your time.
    Note: A virtue ethics approach to digital participation...
  • Elizabeth shared from Net Smart by Howard Rheingold, Anthony Weeks
    learning to live mindfully in cyberculture is as important to us as a civilization as it is vital to you and me as individuals.
    Note: Working on AAR paper on digital ministry paper!
  • Elizabeth shared from The Nonviolent Atonement, Second Edition by J. Denny Weaver
    In this formulation, faith and works are not opposed. Rather, obedience is the result of trusting God to fulfill God's promise.The
    Note: Obedience is a powerful thing at which I consistently fail.
  • Elizabeth shared from Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers by Christian Smith, Melina Lundquist Denton
    Another important general way religious congregations may better engage youth is through simple, ordinary adult relationships with teenagers. Adults other than family members and youth ministers could be intentionally encouraged to make better efforts to learn teens’ names, to strike up conversations with teens, to ask them meaningful questions, to be vulnerable themselves to youth in various ways, to show some interest in them, to help connect them to jobs and internships, to make themselves available in times of trouble and crisis, to work toward becoming models and partners in love and concern...
    Note: @churchnext conversation w/ #stephencady brought #SoulSearching to mind...
  • Elizabeth shared from Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers by Christian Smith, Melina Lundquist Denton
    Religious leaders should stop worrying that their youth are heading by droves into Wicca, experimenting with Buddhism, or searching for alternative transcendent experiences. Instead, religious leaders might get on with the business of simply better animating and educating the youth in their midst.
    Note: Survey says it's not them, it's us...
  • Elizabeth shared from Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers by Christian Smith, Melina Lundquist Denton
    Religious leaders should stop worrying that their youth are heading by droves into Wicca, experimenting with Buddhism, or searching for alternative transcendent experiences. Instead, religious leaders might get on with the business of simply better animating and educating the youth in their midst.
  • Elizabeth shared from Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers by Christian Smith, Melina Lundquist Denton
    It is difficult to overestimate the importance for youth of the transgenerational and age-variable character of most religious organizations in the United States.
    Note: How are we making this happen through age-segregated church activities?
  • Elizabeth shared from Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers by Christian Smith, Melina Lundquist Denton
    The intrinsic problem in capitalism’s logic, however, is that actual human needs are somewhat limited and modest: it takes only so many goods and services to sustain a healthy, potentially satisfying human life.
    Note: I've so often relied on Smith & Denton for data that I forgot how deliciously radical they are.