About Eric Franklin

I'm a Sr. Product Manager for the Kindle Reading Experience, working on making reading more social. I love ambitious books, even when they fail.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Eric shared from Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull, Amy Wallace
    In my experience, creative people discover and realize their visions over time and through dedicated, protracted struggle.
  • Eric shared from The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance by Steven Kotler
    he destroyed his steering foot and knee. Once he sets himself on the board, if either the ankle or the knee gives by even a fraction of an inch, he’s going to fly off the side and die. If you want to talk about pushing limits, most people can’t even stand on a broken ankle. Danny not only stood, he withstood four Gs of pressure going into that quarterpipe—five times in a row.” One G is the force of Earth’s gravity—the force that determines how much we weigh. Formula One drivers, when cornering, pull two. Astronauts, on takeoff, suffer three. Most people black out at five. The four...
  • Eric shared from The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance by Steven Kotler
    that it is over. Danny Way, under ridiculously adverse conditions and with considerable aplomb, just became the first person to leap the Great Wall of China on a skateboard. He broke two world records along the way. And if this were typical athletic fare, this is where our story would end. But the triumph of the podium is rarely what drives action-sport athletes. Way doesn’t skate to break records or win championships. He skates. Period. Plus, MegaRamps cost over half a million dollars to build—so the opportunity to play on one doesn’t come along every day. Thus, with nothing left to prove...
  • Eric shared from The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance by Steven Kotler
    treatment. While this is going on, construction workers get busy. The roll-in is lengthened, the gap is shortened, and, if Way decides to try again, it’ll be another first descent. Of course, he tries again. Twenty-four hours later and barely able to walk, Way climbs those ten flights of stairs a second time. He moves slowly, his breathing
  • Eric shared from The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance by Steven Kotler
    climbs those ten flights of stairs a second time. He moves slowly, his breathing labored, his head
(Seattle, WA)
Eric Franklin