Recent Activity

  • Gail shared from The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo
    there are only two tasks involved—discarding and deciding where to keep things.
    Note: Could this be true?
  • Gail shared from The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo
    Effective tidying involves only two essential actions: discarding and deciding where to store things. Of the two, discarding must come first. This principle does not change. The rest depends on the level of tidiness you personally want to achieve.
    Note: Sad, I can't blame my creative self on my piles - :)
  • Gail shared from The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo
    The root of the problem lies in the fact that people often store the same type of item in more than one place.
    Note: My grandmother had a bar of soap in every room …
  • Gail shared from The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo
    Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved. But sooner or later, all the storage units are full, the room once again overflows with things, and some new and “easy” storage method becomes necessary, creating a negative spiral. This is why tidying must start with discarding. We need to exercise self-control and resist storing our belongings until we have finished identifying what we really want and need to keep.
    Note: This year's New Year's resolution ...
  • Gail shared from The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo
    The work involved can be broadly divided into two kinds: deciding whether or not to dispose of something and deciding where to put it.
    Note: the magic of decluttering...
  • Gail shared from Welcome to Your Brain by Sam Wang, Sandra Aamodt
    Did you know? Your brain uses less power than your refrigerator light
    Note: Hmmm, explains some people ;)
  • Gail shared from The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path for Healing Ourselves and Our World by Desmond Tutu, Mpho Tutu
    Let us condemn ghastly acts, but let us never relinquish the hope that the doers of the most heinous deeds can and may change. In many ways, that was the basis of our truth-and-reconciliation process. The stories we heard at the TRC were horrific, some were bloodcurdling, yet we witnessed extraordinary acts of forgiveness as perpetrator and victim embraced and did so publicly. We believed then, and I still believe now, that it is possible for people to change for the better. It is more than just possible; it is in our nature . . . in each and every one of us.
    Note: Let us condemn the acts…not the person…
  • Gail shared from The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path for Healing Ourselves and Our World by Desmond Tutu, Mpho Tutu
    I was appalled at the story I read. We were all appalled. Johan Kotze was alleged to have forced three laborers at gunpoint to gang-rape and mutilate his estranged wife. He then tied her up and forced her to listen and watch as he shot and killed her son. Johan Kotze claimed he was driven to commit these horrific crimes because he saw his estranged wife with another man and, in his rage, he chose the path of revenge. These are, without doubt, barbaric and dastardly deeds. They are acts so monstrous we are all quite right to condemn them. What shook me deeply as I read the media coverage of this...
    Note: Bishop Tutu's words on how to look at others who need forgiveness …
  • Gail shared from The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path for Healing Ourselves and Our World by Desmond Tutu, Mpho Tutu
    there is nothing that cannot be forgiven, and there is no one undeserving of forgiveness. When you can see and understand that we are all bound to one another—whether by birth, by circumstance, or simply by our shared humanity—then you will know this to be true. I have often said that in South Africa there would have been no future without forgiveness. Our rage and our quest for revenge would have been our destruction. This is as true for us individually as it is for us globally.
    Note: Why I will never support the death penalty …
  • Gail shared from The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path for Healing Ourselves and Our World by Desmond Tutu, Mpho Tutu
    In each of us, there is an innate ability to create joy out of suffering, to find hope in the most hopeless of situations, and to heal any relationship in need of healing.
    Note: Hope and healing ...
(Wilton, NH)
Gail C. Hernandez