About Gaurav Mishra

Poet. Storyteller. Nomad. "Gaurav" helps global brands inspire, oprganize and energize their stakeholders by rethinking purpose, participation and performance. "Gauravonomics" thinks, talks and writes about minimalism, mythology and movements.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Gaurav shared from The Skull Mantra by Eliot Pattison
    people had day souls and night souls, and the most important task in life was to introduce your night soul to your day soul.
    Note: That's what I'm doing these days: introducing my night soul to my day soul.
  • Gaurav shared from Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind by Sakyong Mipham
    One could say that life is at least 50 percent pain. If we do not relate to pain, we are not relating to half our life. Everything is fine when we are happy, but when we are in pain, we become petrified. The inability to relate to pain narrows our playing field. When we are able to work with pain and understand it, life becomes twice as interesting. Relating to pain makes us more fearless and happy.
    Note: Life is essentally about learning how to live with pain; both running and mediating help us learn.
  • Gaurav shared from Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind by Sakyong Mipham
    True confidence is grounded in the unity of mind and body. The two are not meant to be separate. When we only meditate and study, we begin to lose confidence in our physical body. When we only exercise, we begin to lose confidence in our basic goodness and intellect.
    Note: I'm learning tht true confidence is grounded in the unity of mind and body, movement and knowledge.
  • Gaurav shared from Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind by Sakyong Mipham
    The word confidence means to be self-assured about one’s qualities. Both running and meditation give us this feeling. In both activities, confidence naturally ensues because we are experiencing self-assurance. Runners know this, because running is an optimistic sport: fundamentally, we believe in the power of the body. Meditation is also an optimistic tradition: fundamentally, we believe in the potential of the mind. In Tibetan, confidence is known as ziji. This word can also be translated as “brilliance” or “to shine.” Ziji expresses how confidence feels and looks: mentally we shine,...
    Note: Both running and mediating are an expression of optimism, in the power of our body, and our mind.
  • Gaurav shared from Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind by Sakyong Mipham
    We need to exercise both our body and our mind. The nature of the body is form and substance. The nature of the mind is consciousness. Because the body and mind are different by nature, what benefits them is different in nature as well. The body benefits from movement, and the mind benefits from stillness. When we give our mind and body what benefits them, a natural harmony and balance takes place. With this unified approach, we are happy, healthy, and wise.
    Note: I'm teaching myself both movement and stillness.
  • Gaurav shared from The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying: The Spiritual Classic & International Bestseller: Revised and Updated Edition by Sogyal Rinpoche
    Rainer Maria Rilke has said that our deepest fears are like dragons guarding our deepest treasure.12 The fear that impermanence awakens in us, that nothing is real and nothing lasts, is, we come to discover, our greatest friend because it drives us to ask: If everything dies and changes, then what is really true?
    Note: That's the question I have been asking myself: if I'm not this, and not that, who am I?
  • Gaurav shared from The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying: The Spiritual Classic & International Bestseller: Revised and Updated Edition by Sogyal Rinpoche
    Know all things to be like this: A mirage, a cloud castle, A dream, an apparition, Without essence, but with qualities that can be seen.   Know all things to be like this: As the moon in a bright sky In some clear lake reflected, Though to that lake the moon has never moved.   Know all things to be like this: As an echo that derives From music, sounds, and weeping, Yet in that echo is no melody.   Know all things to be like this: As a magician makes illusions Of horses, oxen, carts and other things, Nothing is as it appears.
    Note: I love this poem on impermanence.
  • Gaurav shared from The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying: The Spiritual Classic & International Bestseller: Revised and Updated Edition by Sogyal Rinpoche
    As Tibet’s famous poet saint, Milarepa, said: “My religion is to live—and die—without regret.”
    Note: Such a beautiful thought: my religion is to live and die without regret.
  • Gaurav shared from The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying: The Spiritual Classic & International Bestseller: Revised and Updated Edition by Sogyal Rinpoche
    from the Tibetan Buddhist point of view, we can divide our entire existence into four continuously interlinked realities: (1) life, (2) dying and death, (3) after death, and (4) rebirth. These are known as the four bardos: (1) the natural bardo of this life, (2) the painful bardo of dying, (3) the luminous bardo of dharmata, and (4) the karmic bardo of becoming.
    Note: I am attracted to the Buddhist preoccupation with death.
  • Gaurav shared from Hamlet's BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age by William Powers
    “I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society.”
    Note: From Thoraeu's Walden. My goal in life is to reach such simplicity, live in such minialism.
(Mumbai/ Shanghai/ Singapore)
Gaurav Mishra