About Gaurav Mishra

Poet. Storyteller. Nomad. "Gaurav" helps global brands inspire, oprganize and energize their stakeholders by rethinking purpose, participation and performance. "Gauravonomics" thinks, talks and writes about minimalism, mythology and movements.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Gaurav shared from Hamlet's BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age by William Powers
    Transcendentalists believed that true enlightenment does not come from other people or outward sources such as organized religion, scientific observation, and books; rather, it comes from within. The profoundest truths about existence are available to each of us through intuition and reflection.
    Note: Transendentalism sounds a little like Vipassana. Must read more about it.
  • Gaurav shared from Hamlet's BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life in the Digital Age by William Powers
    The twentieth-century thinker Michel Foucault had a nice phrase for philosophical tools that help us improve and transform our lives: technologies of the self. That’s what we need now, a new technology of the self for a digital world.
    Note: FutureCrafting explores what Micael Focault called 'technologies of the self'.
  • Gaurav shared from Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff
    Although religious historian James Carse came up with the concept of “infinite games” well before computer games had overtaken television, music, and movies as our dominant entertainment industry, his two categories of play help explain why electronic gaming would gain such favor in an era of present shock. Finite games are those with fixed endings—winners and losers. Most every game from tennis to football works this way. Victory is the scarcity: there can be only one winner, so players compete for the win. Infinite games, on the other hand, are more about the play itself. They do not have...
    Note: "Futurism is a finite game (stories); presentism is an infinite game (play)." - Douglass Rushkoff
  • Gaurav shared from Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff
    Although religious historian James Carse came up with the concept of “infinite games” well before computer games had overtaken television, music, and movies as our dominant entertainment industry, his two categories of play help explain why electronic gaming would gain such favor in an era of present shock. Finite games are those with fixed endings—winners and losers. Most every game from tennis to football works this way. Victory is the scarcity: there can be only one winner, so players compete for the win. Infinite games, on the other hand, are more about the play itself. They do not have...
    Note: Futurism is a finite game built around narrative stories; presentism is an infinite game built around play." - Douglass Rushkoff
  • Gaurav shared from Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff
    Games offer a healthier, or at least more active, response to the collapse of narrativity confounding much of the rest of popular culture. They also offer us an inkling of how we may avert present shock altogether and instead adopt approaches that successfully reorient us to the all-at-onceness of life today. Instead of panicking at the death of the story, players become the story and delight in acting it out in real time. The people designing the game can still communicate values if they choose to; they simply need to do it by offering choices instead of making them in advance.
    Note: "Games are replacing narrative stories by enabling players to become the story." - Douglas Rushkoff
  • Gaurav shared from Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff
    Games offer a healthier, or at least more active, response to the collapse of narrativity confounding much of the rest of popular culture. They also offer us an inkling of how we may avert present shock altogether and instead adopt approaches that successfully reorient us to the all-at-onceness of life today. Instead of panicking at the death of the story, players become the story and delight in acting it out in real time. The people designing the game can still communicate values if they choose to; they simply need to do it by offering choices instead of making them in advance.
    Note: Games are replacing narrative stories by enabling players to become the story. - Douglas Rushkoff
  • Gaurav shared from Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff
    If the end of the twentieth century can be characterized by futurism, the twenty-first can be defined by presentism.
    Note: "If the 20th century was about futurism, the 21st century is about presentism." - Douglas Rushkoff
  • Gaurav shared from Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now by Douglas Rushkoff
    If the end of the twentieth century can be characterized by futurism, the twenty-first can be defined by presentism.
    Note: If the 20th century was about futurism, the 21st century is about presentism. - Douglas Rushkoff
  • Gaurav shared from Wisdom 2.0 by Soren Gordhamer
    For most of us, there is no question that we will continue to use and benefit from the great technologies of our age and live what we may call 2.0 lives. The question, instead, is whether we will live Stress 2.0 or Addiction 2.0 or Wisdom 2.0, whether we will relate to these devices creatively or stressfully. Those of us fortunate to have access to the Internet and to cell phones will need to answer this question for ourselves. For those of us who walk the Wisdom 2.0 path, the challenge is to bring consciousness into our actions.
    Note: Loved reading @SorenG's Wisdom 2.0. Hope to speak at @Wisdom2Conf one day. http://futurecrafting.com
  • Gaurav shared from Wisdom 2.0 by Soren Gordhamer
    For most of us, there is no question that we will continue to use and benefit from the great technologies of our age and live what we may call 2.0 lives. The question, instead, is whether we will live Stress 2.0 or Addiction 2.0 or Wisdom 2.0, whether we will relate to these devices creatively or stressfully. Those of us fortunate to have access to the Internet and to cell phones will need to answer this question for ourselves. For those of us who walk the Wisdom 2.0 path, the challenge is to bring consciousness into our actions.
    Note: Loved reading 'Wisdom 2.0' by Soren Gordhamer. Hope to make it to @Wisdom2Conf some day.
(Mumbai/ Shanghai/ Singapore)
Gaurav Mishra