About Gerd Leonhard

Keynote Speaker, Think-Tank Leader, Futurist, Author & Strategist, Idea Curator, Occasional Heretic, CEO of TheFuturesAgency, Founder of GreenFuturists, Visiting Professor at Fundacao Dom Cabral (Brazil). @gleonhard on Twitter, Facebook & Youtube. Based in Switzerland (and to be found in airline lounges around the world:)

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Gerd shared from The Future of Content by Gerd Leonhard
    the music industry as we knew it is OVER. And good riddance. The organizers tried hard (and did well!) but you have to wonder: what are you (the industry) waiting for? Is it not time to VOTE FOR SERIOUS CHANGE in the music industry, and make that switch to an open, collaborative and mutually fruitful ecosystem? Like... now?
    Note: I wrote this at #midem 2009 - and it's also why I am not going anymore. #musicindustry game over
  • Gerd shared from The Future of Content by Gerd Leonhard
    that follows my work knows what my message to the music industry has been, for the past 10 years: Change. Embrace technology and empower the User. Make the Artists Partners. Give Permission. Collaborate. Innovate constantly. Get out of your own way. Compensation not Control. Until a few years ago, to talk about transparency, equality and collaboration was considered treason and people looked at me with deep pity
    Note: @gleonhard: I wrote this about music industry #midem 2009 - wont go anymore;) http://t.co/DbkRmiDa
  • Gerd shared from The Future of Content by Gerd Leonhard
    that
    Note: I wrote this about the music industry at #midem 2009 - and it describes why I am not going anymore 2
  • Gerd shared from Brain Power: From Neurons to Networks (Kindle Single) by Tiffany Shlain
    He often cited a quote from Sophocles: “Nothing vast enters the lives of mortals without a curse.”1
    Note: "Nothing vast enters the lives of mortals without a curse" Sophocles #internet #solomo #futuristgerd
  • Gerd shared from Race Against The Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy by Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee
    There was a type of employee at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution whose job and livelihood largely vanished in the early twentieth century. This was the horse.
    Note: Good point: what happened to horses in industrial revolution could happen to low-skilled workers now
(Switzerland)
Gerd Leonhard