About Gregory Cohoon

I am an amateur theologian.
I love to ride my black motorcycle, but I don't do it enough.
Johnny Cash is my favorite country music singer.
The Derek Trucks Band is my favorite current band.
I play mandolin.
I am also known as Dr. Mellow.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Gregory shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    The same person who would never raise his hand in a lecture hall of two hundred people might blog to two thousand, or two million, without thinking twice. The same person who finds it difficult to introduce himself to strangers might establish a presence online and then extend these relationships into the real world.
    Note: This sounds familiar.
  • Gregory shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    social media has made new forms of leadership possible for scores of people who don’t fit the Harvard Business School mold.
    Note: Yay, Internet!
  • Gregory shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    about talking in class. How much class participation is too much? How little is too little? When does publicly disagreeing with a classmate constitute healthy debate, and when does it seem competitive
    Note: This book about introversion makes me sad my workplace is so blatently designed to serve extroverts.
  • Gregory shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    the most unlikely people consider themselves introverts.
    Note: Many introverts pretend to be extroverts. Like me.
  • Gregory shared from The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave: How to Recognize the Subtle Signs and Act Before It's Too Late by Leigh Branham
    workers—Gen Xers and Millennials—have watched their parents lose their jobs after years of being loyal to their employers. So they no longer expect lifetime employment as their parents once did. Their more realistic expectation is lifetime employability, which means that training is of paramount importance to them. In their minds, learning new skills and acquiring new knowledge equate to increasing their value and sense of career security. It comes down to this seeming contradiction: You have to train your employees to the point where they know they are more marketable or else they’ll leave....
    Note: I like the distinction between lifetime employment (fiction) and lifetime employability (realistic).
(Greensboro, NC USA)
Gregory Cohoon