About Italo Perazzoli

Hi I Am A Proud Librarian Assistant/Museum Operator. <br />On Google Plus, Every Day, I Publish My Thoughts And Writings on Art, Literature and Philosophy.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Italo shared from Philosophy Bites by David Edmonds, Nigel Warburton
    Are you suggesting then that a possible motivation for watching a tragedy is not pleasure but the pursuit of truth, maybe truth about the human condition or something like that?
  • Italo shared from Philosophy Bites by David Edmonds, Nigel Warburton
    Aristotle didn’t just say, ‘We take pleasure in tragedy’; what he said is that the tragic poet aims to produce the pleasure of pity and fear.
  • Italo shared from Philosophy Bites by David Edmonds, Nigel Warburton
    So, in Macbeth, you feel the pain as you hear Duncan being gruesomely murdered offstage, and then immediately afterwards you get the pleasure from the light-hearted porter scene, which is a humorous scene.
  • Italo shared from Philosophy Bites by David Edmonds, Nigel Warburton
    Indeed, he says that the job of the tragic poet is to aim at producing in the audience a particular kind of pleasure, and he describes that as the pleasure of pity and fear.
    Note: (Aristotle)
  • Italo shared from Philosophy Bites by David Edmonds, Nigel Warburton
    Aristotle defines tragedy in terms of the affective, or the emotional, response that it’s designed to generate, which is, he says, the catharsis of pity and fear. ‘Catharsis’ is often taken to mean something like a purging or a cleansing of emotion.