Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • J. shared from Libriomancer: (Magic Ex Libris Book 1) by Jim C. Hines
    I slammed the book shut and crowed, “And that is why you don’t kick the librarian off the investigation!” “You’re doing it again.” “Doing what?” “Showing off.” She started the engine. “Damn right I am.”
    Note: really enjoying this mashup of librarianship, fantasy, and vampires
  • J. shared from Suffering Succotash: A Picky Eater's Quest to Understand Why We Hate the Foods We Hate by Stephanie V.W. Lucianovic
    There aren’t just five tastes—sweet, sour, salty, bitter, umami/savory—there are actually six. That’s right: Along with our twenty-five bitter taste receptor genes, there are six tastes. The sixth taste is calcium/mineral, and not a ton is known about it thus far.
    Note: did not know this. now I want to do taste tests. cc @deannapdenk, @kdeiss
  • J. shared from Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle For Internet Freedom by Rebecca MacKinnon
    This book is my effort to raise the level of public awareness about the many inconvenient truths of the Internet age.
    Note: really looking forward to reading this AND hearing Rebecca MacKinnon speak at #ala12
  • J. shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    “Putting theory into practice is hard for them,” writes Gallagher, “because their sensitive natures and elaborate schemes are unsuited to the heterogeneous rigors of the schoolyard.” Yet as we’ll see in the chapters to come, these traits—alertness, sensitivity to nuance, complex emotionality—turn out to be highly underrated powers.
    Note: hear that world? my introversion is an underrated power! #gome
  • J. shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    we’re so impressed by the power of online collaboration that we’ve come to overvalue all group work at the expense of solo thought. We fail to realize that participating in an online working group is a form of solitude all its own. Instead we assume that the success of online collaborations will be replicated in the face-to-face world.
    Note: there are some really interesting - and challenging - ideas in this book
  • J. shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    “Respect for individual human personality has with us reached its lowest point,” observed one intellectual in 1921, “and it is delightfully ironical that no nation is so constantly talking about personality as we are. We actually have schools for ‘self-expression’ and ‘self-development,’ although we seem usually to mean the expression and development of the personality of a successful real estate agent.”
    Note: BSG is right about EVERYTHING! "All of this has happened before, and it will all happen again."
  • J. shared from The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption by Clay A. Johnson
    Figure 10-3. A sample information nutrition label. I don’t want to tell you what information to consume, or impose my own biases on you—that wouldn’t be responsible. Instead, I want to give you a framework for information consumption.
    Note: testing if I can share this interesting graphic from "The Information Diet" on my #kindle
  • J. shared from Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room by David Weinberger
    The physical nature of books thereby enables and encourages long-form thought. “Enables and encourages” because the physical nature of books is not enough to entirely account for it: To a different culture on a different path of thought, bound pages might look like an encouragement to divide thought up into page-sized chunks, as with PowerPoint.
    Note: great analogy: the book as the powerpoint of long-term thought
  • J. shared from Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room by David Weinberger
    what we heard was: Facts give us a way of settling our disagreements. But networked facts open out into a network of disagreement. We may miss the old Age of Classic Facts, but we should recognize that its view of facts was based not in fact but in the paper medium that published facts.
    Note: I love this book so far
  • J. shared from Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room by David Weinberger
    this is not merely a shift from displaying rectangles of text on a book page to displaying those rectangles on a screen. It’s the connecting of knowledge—the networking—that is changing our oldest, most basic strategy of knowing. Rather than knowing-by-reducing to what fits in a library or a scientific journal, we are now knowing-by-including every draft of every idea in vast, loosely connected webs.
    Note: @olinj @oodja @paloverde @dweinberger 5% in, I'm already declaring it one of the best books of 2012
(Chicago, IL)
J. Levine