About James Corbett

Founder & CEO of not-for-profit in education sector.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • James shared from a Personal Document
    In Sir Ken Robinson's TED talk, Do Schools Kill Creativity?, he reminds us that our educational system has stigmatized mistakes. As a result, kids are frightened of being wrong. Yet if we are not prepared to be wrong than we won't be able to come up with anything creative or solve complex problems. Videogames, on the other hand, embed trial and error into the foundation of gameplay.
    Note: Kids who are afraid of being wrong can't be creative or solve complex problems #igbl
  • James shared from a Personal Document
    "When people learn to play videogames," according to James Paul Gee, "they are learning a new literacy." This is one of the reason kids love playing them: They are learning a new interactive language that grants them access to virtual worlds that are filled with intrigue, engagement and meaningful challenges.
    Note: Kids are 'learning a new interactive language', a new literacy when playing video games #igbl
  • James shared from A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas, John Seely Brown
    Indwelling is a familiarity with ideas, practices, and processes that are so engrained they become second nature. Not unlike the notion of inquiry, indwelling is also an adaptive process, meaning that the practices that become second nature have flexibility; they are responsive to changes in the environment and situation. They become an embodied set of practices that are both constantly changing and evolving yet also central to the definition of inquiry.
    Note: Indwelling: an additional layer to inquiry (based learning)
  • James shared from A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas, John Seely Brown
    Inquiry is an extremely powerful technique for learning because it produces stockpiles of experiences. Things that result in dead ends for one particular question may wind up being unexpectedly useful later on—even, perhaps, for a completely different question.
    Note: Inquiry is a very powerful technique for learning because it produces stockpiles of experiences.
  • James shared from A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas, John Seely Brown
    Students showed up in Doug’s office with no idea of what they wanted to write about. So, in response, he would ask them: “What is it that you care most deeply and passionately about? What is it that you will wake up every morning wanting to write about?” He was shocked when student after student answered in roughly the same way: “I don’t know. No one has ever asked me that question before.”
    Note: Has the education system killed all passion?
  • James shared from A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas, John Seely Brown
    A line of research begun by Harvard University professor Richard J. Light demonstrated that study groups dramatically increase the success of college students in the classroom. Further studies have shown that virtual study groups also work and that more casual forms of virtual learning, supported by social media, can extend well beyond the campus and reach a much broader audience.
    Note: Social learning works.
  • James shared from A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas, John Seely Brown
    “To use an obvious analogy, jazz entered our civilization much later than composed, formal music. But it hasn’t replaced it; and no jazz musician would ever claim that it could. Jazz merely demands a different way of playing and listening, just as blogging requires a different mode of writing and reading. Jazz and blogging are intimate, improvisational, and individual—but also inherently collective. And the audience talks over both.” Substitute “new culture of learning” for “jazz” and “traditional forms of education” for “composed, formal music,” and we couldn’t have said it better ourselves.
    Note: 'Jazz' is to 'Composed formal music' as 'New culture of learning' is to 'Traditional education'
  • James shared from A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas, John Seely Brown
    Sullivan draws two parallels to music that illustrate the phenomenon. In the first, he writes, “There are times, in fact, when a blogger feels less like a writer than an online disc jockey, mixing samples of tunes and generating new melodies through mashups while also making his own music. He is both artist and producer—and the beat always goes on.”
    Note: Online disc jockey as analogy for the remix culture that seeps through digital meedia
(Limerick, Ireland)
James Corbett