Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Jane shared from Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance
    This was the construct she’d built in her head: Most of the beneficiaries of the system were extravagant moochers, but she—despite never having worked in her life—was an obvious exception.
    Note: . There's a video of interviewees in rural ?Alabama? with a man living in the most abject poverty explaining that no one should get 'handouts' like food stamps-- except for him.
  • Jane shared from Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance
    Our men suffer from a peculiar crisis of masculinity in which some of the very traits that our culture inculcates make it difficult to succeed in a changing world.
    Note: Wondering how this fits with current issues around "toxic masculinity".
  • Jane shared from Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance
    Rather, these migrants disrupted a broad set of assumptions held by northern whites about how white people appeared, spoke, and behaved . . . the disturbing aspect of hillbillies was their racialness. Ostensibly, they were of the same racial order (whites) as those who dominated economic, political, and social power in local and national arenas. But hillbillies shared many regional characteristics with the southern blacks arriving in Detroit.”10
    Note: o
  • Jane shared from The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
    Habits are powerful, but delicate. They can emerge outside our consciousness, or can be deliberately designed. They often occur without our permission, but can be reshaped by fiddling with their parts. They shape our lives far more than we realize—they are so strong, in fact, that they cause our brains to cling to them at the exclusion of all else, including common sense.
    Note: A9 "Habits so strong... We cling to them at the exclusion of all else" #lrnbk
  • Jane shared from The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
    As the route became more and more automatic, each rat started thinking less and less.
    Note: ...started thinking less & less... #lrnbk
(Durham, NC)
Jane Bozarth