Recent Activity

  • Jarod shared from Kiss of Midnight: A Midnight Breed Novel by Lara Adrian
    “The next time I’m witnessing a bloody slaughter by a gang of psychos, I’ll have to remember to bring my Leica and a few extra lenses.”
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    In medieval England, children were not usually officially named until they had survived their first year. Mortality was so high that families avoided getting overly attached to newcomers whose chances of lasting a whole year were less than even. In contrast, in our modern industrial society, with life expectancy at over 70 years, we do not expect children to die before adulthood, and when this does occasionally occur, people become deeply upset.
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    Throughout history, the bulk of the human population was poorly fed and lived short, squalid, thoroughly unhygienic lives. In better-than-usual periods of history, those who survived infancy might hope to make it to 40 years, on average. In truly miserable periods of history, such as the early Middle Ages, blighted by war, famine, and pestilence, the overall life expectancy may have sunk as low as 20 years.
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    Sickle cell anemia is a by-product of resistance to malaria, and cystic fibrosis of resistance to diarrheal diseases, especially typhoid.
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    both predation and disease improve the species, often in a rather nonspecific manner, by selecting for healthy and vigorous individuals.
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    The best way to control these diseases is to kill the vectors, thus interrupting transmission. Spraying insecticides such as DDT greatly reduced the incidence of malaria in many areas. Sadly, malaria is making a comeback in many parts of the Third World, due partly to insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and partly to complacency and political disintegration. Irrigation projects such as dams, reservoirs, and irrigation canals often work well in temperate climates. However, in tropical regions, they may backfire. They create large bodies of stationary water that are ideal breeding grounds for the mosquitoes...
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    Infectious diseases from microorganisms have caused most deaths by far throughout recorded human history. In this respect, our own age is peculiar. Thanks to modern technology, we mostly live long enough to worry about heart disease and cancer. But for most societies throughout history, most people met their end from infections caused by microorganisms of some kind. This is still true for some Third World countries. Despite this, scientists have understood the nature of infectious disease only since the late 1800s.
  • Jarod shared from Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (FT Press Science) by David P. Clark
    denser populations are the first to build up resistance to the current infectious diseases in their region of the world.
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Jarod