Recent Activity

  • Jay shared from The Upanishads (Classic of Indian Spirituality) by Eknath Easwaran
    Materialism reinforces a “paradigm of scarcity”: there is not enough to go around, so we are doomed to fight one another for ever-diminishing resources. Spiritual economics begins not from the assumed scarcity of matter but from the verifiable infinitude of consciousness.
    Note: a very Gandhian idea: materialism reinforces a paradigm of scarcity
  • Jay shared from Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age by Clay Shirky
    Projects that will work only if they grow large generally won’t grow large; people who are fixated on creating large-scale future success can actually reduce the possibility of creating the small-scale here-and-now successes needed to get there. A veritable natural law in social media is that to get to a system that is large and good, it is far better to start with a system that is small and good and work on making it bigger than to start with a system that is large and mediocre and working on making it better.
    Note: size does matter when creating social systems. start small amd scale
  • Jay shared from Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age by Clay Shirky
    If we want to create new forms of civic value, we need to improve the ability of small groups to try radical things,
    Note: civic value comes from empowering small groups to experiment
  • Jay shared from Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age by Clay Shirky
    In 1993 sociologist Bruno Frey found that Swiss citizens, when asked whether they would approve a hypothetical government proposal to site nuclear waste storage in their region, were split about equally on the question. When Frey rephrased the question to include the possibility that the government would pay the citizens for housing the waste, however, they shifted to three to one against the proposal. The prospect of hosting a waste dump was twice as unpopular when it was presented as an activity for which the community could be compensated as when it was presented as an issue of civic duty....
    Note: which motivates the most: civic duty vs compensation? find out #gov20
  • Jay shared from Extreme Government Makeover: Increasing Our Capacity to Do More Good by Ken Miller
    For example, the 2010 health-care debate was framed by cogent arguments along the lines of, "You want the people who run the post office and the DMV to run your hospital?" Our government friends in Canada have a great motto: "Performance Equals Trust." People's trust in government to solve problems (currently at an all-time low) is shaped by their experience with the performance of government. If we can't get citizens a birth certificate before they get their death certificate, they will rightly question our ability to improve health access.
    Note: #gov performance equals trust. we need to the basics well otherwise forget the big challenges
(San Francisco)
Jay and Chris