About Jill

Mother • Loving Wife • Kindle user • Adequate cook • Sporadic exerciser

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Jill shared from Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss
    To those who care about punctuation, a sentence such as “Thank God its Friday” (without the apostrophe) rouses feelings not only of despair but of violence. The confusion of the possessive “its” (no apostrophe) with the contractive “it’s” (with apostrophe) is an unequivocal signal of illiteracy and sets off a simple Pavlovian “kill” response in the average stickler. The rule is: the word “it’s” (with apostrophe) stands for “it is” or “it has”. If the word does not stand for “it is” or “it has” then what you require is “its”.
    Note: Take note: its v. it's
  • Jill shared from Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss
    To those who care about punctuation, a sentence such as “Thank God its Friday” (without the apostrophe) rouses feelings not only of despair but of violence. The confusion of the possessive “its” (no apostrophe) with the contractive “it’s” (with apostrophe) is an unequivocal signal of illiteracy and sets off a simple Pavlovian “kill” response in the average stickler. The rule is: the word “it’s” (with apostrophe) stands for “it is” or “it has”. If the word does not stand for “it is” or “it has” then what you require is “its”.
    Note: Take note: its v. it's
  • Jill shared from Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach
    Gravity is why there are suns and planets in the first place. It is practically God. In the beginning, the cosmos was nothing but empty space and vast clouds of gases. Eventually the gases cooled to the point where tiny grains coalesced. These grains would have spent eternity moving through space, ignoring each other, had gravitational attraction not brought them together. Gravitation is the lust of the cosmos. As more particles joined the orgy, these celestial blobs grew in size.
    Note: Gravity is just one big particle orgy.
  • Jill shared from a Personal Document
    "Would you please tell me what you mean by complementarity?" asked Alice. "Why of course. By complementarity I mean that there are certain things you cannot know, not all at the same time anyhow." "Complementarity doesn't mean that," protested Alice. "It does when I use it," replied the Mechanic. "Words mean what I choose. It is a question of who is to be master, that is all. Complementarity, that's what I say."
    Note: Alice in Quantumland #complementarity
  • Jill shared from Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace by Ayelet Waldman
    Never once has Michael loaded the dishwasher according to the system that it took me years—literally years—to perfect. More often than not, I shove him aside and redo it myself. Frankly, my method is quite clearly the only way to load a dishwasher, not to mention the only way to make sure the little arms don’t snap off those French onion soup bowls. And it’s not like I haven’t given him detailed instructions about the system dozens, even hundreds of times.
    Note: I am super guilty of this very crime, ask Richy.
  • Jill shared from Breakfast with Buddha: A Novel by Roland Merullo
    I think sometimes that our national obsession with sex (and if you don't think there is a national obsession with sex, just browse the magazine racks in the local chain bookstore) is really nothing more than a profound spiritual longing in disguise: the desire to exhaust all other desires and feel loved and sated, at peace with our fragmented modern selves, linked to those around us. At peace, at rest.
    Note: Sooooo true.
  • Jill shared from Committed: A Love Story by Elizabeth Gilbert
    The Buddha referred to married people as “householders.” He even gave clear instructions as to how one should be a good householder: Be nice to your spouse, be honest, be faithful, give alms to the poor, buy some insurance against fire and flood . . . I’m dead serious: The Buddha literally advised married couples to buy property insurance.
    Note: The Buddha knows what's up. Does he endorse @FlInsGoddess?
  • Jill shared from Committed: A Love Story by Elizabeth Gilbert
    So when modern-day religious conservatives wax nostalgic about how marriage is a sacred tradition that reaches back into history for thousands of uninterrupted years, they are absolutely correct, but in only one respect—only if they happen to be talking about Judaism. Christianity simply does not share that deep and consistent historical reverence toward matrimony.
    Note: Conservatives, wrong? I thought they knew everything about the sanctity of marriage.
  • Jill shared from Committed: A Love Story by Elizabeth Gilbert
    Marriage shifts. It changes over the centuries the way that Irish weather changes: constantly, surprisingly, swiftly. It’s not even a safe bet to define marriage in the most reductively simple terms as a sacred union between one man and one woman. First of all, marriage has not always been considered “sacred,” not even within the Christian tradition. And for most of human history, to be honest, marriage has usually been seen as a union between one man and several women.
    Note: History teaches us not to limit marriage as a sacred union between one man and one woman. #noh8
  • Jill shared from Committed: A Love Story by Elizabeth Gilbert
    As a result of such personal freedoms, my life belongs to me and resembles me to an extent that would be unthinkable in the hills of northern Vietnam, even today. It’s almost as if I’m from an entirely new strain of woman (Homo limitlessness, you might call us). And while we of this brave new species do have possibilities that are vast and magnificent and almost infinite in scope, it’s important to remember that our choice-rich lives have the potential to breed their own brand of trouble.
    Note: With unlimited potential, you get unlimited neuroses. #FirstWorldProblems
(Coconut Creek, FL, United States)
Jill