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  • Joseph shared from When Children Became People: The Birth of Childhood in Early Christianity by O. M. Bakke
    From the mid-third century, and perhaps from the New Testament period onward, children received the sacraments: in a wide geographical area, they were baptized and took part in the Eucharist. This implies that they were regarded as subjects with needs of their own and with the capacity to receive the same spiritual gifts as adults. The fact that they received baptism and communion also shows that they were perceived as full members of the community.Children's active participation went further, however. The sources tell us that they played an active part in hymn-singing, that they were cantors,...
    Note: Thoughts about children in the early church
  • Joseph shared from When Children Became People: The Birth of Childhood in Early Christianity by O. M. Bakke
    From the mid-third century, and perhaps from the New Testament period onward, children received the sacraments: in a wide geographical area, they were baptized and took part in the Eucharist. This implies that they were regarded as subjects with needs of their own and with the capacity to receive the same spiritual gifts as adults. The fact that they received baptism and communion also shows that they were perceived as full members of the community.Children's active participation went further, however. The sources tell us that they played an active part in hymn-singing, that they were cantors,...
  • Joseph shared from When Children Became People: The Birth of Childhood in Early Christianity by O. M. Bakke
    Do our sources tell us anything about a minimum age for children who began as lectors? Ennodius's remark that Epiphanius became a lector at the age of eight is, of course, highly interesting, 144 as are epitaphs from the fifth and sixth centuries that speak of lectors who were no more than five years old when they died.141 According to these sources, boys could be very young when they were ordained as lectors-indeed, so young that it is hard to believe they were sufficiently skilled at reading to be able to perform their tasks satisfactorily.
    Note: About the minimum age of lectors (readers) in the early church...
  • Joseph shared from When Children Became People: The Birth of Childhood in Early Christianity by O. M. Bakke
    even if there is no trace of our modern endeavors to integrate children into worship, and no discussion of children's role in liturgy, children did in fact play an active part and had specific liturgical roles. Our sources speak of this only seldom and in passing, but they tell us that children in general were active singers. It was their task to sing particular responses in the liturgy and to sing in the choir, and they could also function as lectors.
    Note: Comments regarding children's involvement in worship in the early church.
  • Joseph shared from Following Jesus in a Culture of Fear (The Christian Practice of Everyday Life) by Scott Bader-Saye
    When "good parenting" is replaced by "safe parenting," child rearing is easily captured by consumption-we may not be able to buy goodness, but we can buy safety. And if a given product claims to makeyour child safer, how do you refrain from buying it without seeming to say, "I'm not interested in my child's safety." Yet where does it end? Being locked in a padded room is very safe, but it's hardly a life.
    Note: On parenting and fear...
(Hendersonville, TN USA)
Joseph B. Howard
Web Page: http://frjody.com