Recent Activity

  • Josh shared from Mavericks at Work by William C. Taylor, Polly G. LaBarre
    collaboration works best when the focus of the collaboration is narrow and tightly defined: find 6 million ounces of gold on a specific mine site; write the best component for a particular software application. In other words, don’t confuse being open-minded with being poorly organized.
  • Josh shared from Mavericks at Work by William C. Taylor, Polly G. LaBarre
    “Scientists and engineers have to change their job descriptions,” he insists. “I tell them, ‘Stop thinking of yourselves as problem-solvers. You have to become solution-finders.’ That’s not a semantic distinction. It’s one of the most fundamental distinctions we make. A problem-solver is someone who gets handed a challenge, goes into the lab, and doesn’t come out until he or she has an answer. A solution-finder looks around the world and is agnostic as to where the answer comes from, so long as it’s the best answer at the lowest cost in the shortest time.”
  • Josh shared from Mavericks at Work by William C. Taylor, Polly G. LaBarre
    “Spandex Rule of Branding,” and it applies to strategy as well as marketing: “Just because you can doesn’t mean you should.”
  • Josh shared from Mavericks at Work by William C. Taylor, Polly G. LaBarre
    Why invest so much energy in building a vocabulary as opposed to just, say, building factories and laboratories for clients? “Because at the heart of every great company is a clear sense of purpose,” answers Peter Salvati, a senior DPR executive who works out of the company’s San Diego office and has played a lead role in Mission 2030. “One of the things I always have fun with—and I’ve probably done this with a hundred clients—is to suggest that they ask other construction companies, ‘Why does your company exist?’ You ought to be able to answer that about your own company. But...
    Note: Crucial business strategy for any industry.
  • Josh shared from Mavericks at Work by William C. Taylor, Polly G. LaBarre
    “Even in the face of massive competition, don’t think about the competition. Literally don’t think about them. Every time you’re in a meeting and you’re tempted to talk about a competitor, replace that thought with one about user feedback or surveys.
    Note: Competition or customers?
  • Josh shared from The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs by Cynthia Montgomery
    It wasn’t until years into this shift that I fully realized what had happened. It was classic Shakespeare: As a field, we had hoisted ourselves on our own petard. We had demoted strategy from the top of the organization to a specialist function. Chasing a new ideal, we had lost sight of the value of what we had—the richness of judgment, the continuity of purpose, the will to commit an organization to a particular path. With all good intentions, we had backed strategy into a narrow corner and reduced it to a left-brain exercise. In doing so, we lost much of its vitality and much of its connection...
  • Josh shared from The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs by Cynthia Montgomery
    It wasn’t until years into this shift that I fully realized what had happened. It was classic Shakespeare: As a field, we had hoisted ourselves on our own petard. We had demoted strategy from the top of the organization to a specialist function. Chasing a new ideal, we had lost sight of the value of what we had—the richness of judgment, the continuity of purpose, the will to commit an organization to a particular path. With all good intentions, we had backed strategy into a narrow corner and reduced it to a left-brain exercise. In doing so, we lost much of its vitality and much of its connection...
  • Josh shared from Kingpin: How One Hacker Took Over the Billion-Dollar Cybercrime Underground by Kevin Poulsen
    Thanks in large part to Maksik’s hacker and Max Vision, the popular consumer impression that Web transactions were less secure than real-life purchases was now completely false. In 2007, the majority of compromised cards were stolen from brick-and-mortar retailers and restaurants.
    Note: Click-through to read statistic on CC fraud/theft.
  • Josh shared from How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer
    "When the brain is exposed to anything random, like a slot machine or the shape of a cloud, it automatically imposes a pattern onto the noise. But that isn't Snoopy, and you haven't found the secret pattern in the stock market."
(New York, NY)
Josh Stephenson