About Joshua Rosenblum

Phlegmatic paladin of the Enlightenment, Defender of Liberty hither and yon!

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Joshua shared from The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Fragility" (Incerto) by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Capitalism is, among other things, the revitalization of the world thanks to the opportunity to be lucky. Luck is the grand equalizer, because almost everyone can benefit from it. The socialist governments protected their monsters and, by doing so, killed potential newcomers in the womb.
  • Joshua shared from The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Fragility" (Incerto) by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    In fact, the reason I felt immediately at home in America is precisely because American culture encourages the process of failure, unlike the cultures of Europe and Asia where failure is met with stigma and embarrassment. America’s specialty is to take these small risks for the rest of the world, which explains this country’s disproportionate share in innovations. Once established, an idea or a product is later “perfected” over there.
  • Joshua shared from The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Fragility" (Incerto) by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Know how to rank beliefs not according to their plausibility but by the harm they may cause.
  • Joshua shared from The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Fragility" (Incerto) by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    Let us apply this reasoning to September 11, 2001. Around twenty-five hundred people were directly killed by bin Laden’s group in the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. Their families benefited from the support of all manner of agencies and charities, as they should. But, according to researchers, during the remaining three months of the year, close to one thousand people died as silent victims of the terrorists. How? Those who were afraid of flying and switched to driving ran an increased risk of death. There was evidence of an increase of casualties on the road during that period; the...
  • Joshua shared from The Black Swan: Second Edition: The Impact of the Highly Improbable Fragility" (Incerto) by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
    In his essay “What We See and What We Don’t See,” Bastiat offered the following idea: we can see what governments do, and therefore sing their praises—but we do not see the alternative. But there is an alternative; it is less obvious and remains unseen. Recall the confirmation fallacy: governments are great at telling you what they did, but not what they did not do. In fact, they engage in what could be labeled as phony “philanthropy,” the activity of helping people in a visible and sensational way without taking into account the unseen cemetery of invisible consequences. Bastiat inspired...
(Kandahar, Afghanistan)
Joshua Rosenblum