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  • Julio shared from The Selfish Gene: 30th Anniversary edition by Richard Dawkins
    Faith cannot move mountains (though generations of children are solemnly told the contrary and believe it). But it is capable of driving people to such dangerous folly that faith seems to me to qualify as a kind of mental illness. It leads people to believe in whatever it is so strongly that in extreme cases they are prepared to kill and to die for it without the need for further justification. Keith Henson has coined the name ‘memeoids’ for ‘victims that have been taken over by a meme to the extent that their own survival becomes inconsequential . . . You see lots of these people on the...
  • Julio shared from The Selfish Gene: 30th Anniversary edition by Richard Dawkins
    Faith cannot move mountains (though generations of children are solemnly told the contrary and believe it). But it is capable of driving people to such dangerous folly that faith seems to me to qualify as a kind of mental illness. It leads people to believe in whatever it is so strongly that in extreme cases they are prepared to kill and to die for it without the need for further justification. Keith Henson has coined the name ‘memeoids’ for ‘victims that have been taken over by a meme to the extent that their own survival becomes inconsequential . . . You see lots of these people on the...
  • Julio shared from The Selfish Gene: 30th Anniversary edition by Richard Dawkins
    I am reminded of P. B. Medawar’s remark about the attractions of ‘philosophy-fiction’ to ‘a large population of people, often with well-developed literary and scholarly tastes, who have been educated far beyond their capacity to undertake analytical thought’.
    Note: Jajaja soy muy muy fan de Dawkins.
  • Julio shared from Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other by Sherry Turkle
    http://bourbon.usc.edu/iml/recall/papers/carpe2k4-pub.pdf
  • Julio shared from Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other by Sherry Turkle
    For an overview of robots in medical settings, focusing on research on Alzheimer’s and autism, see Jerome Groopman, “Robots That Care: Advances in Technological Therapy,” The New Yorker, November 2, 2009, www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/11/02/091102fa_fact_groopman (accessed November 11, 2009).