About Karla Amaral Lopez

Life is too short to hang around.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Karla shared from Politics Lost: How American Democracy Was Trivialized By People Who Think You're Stupid by Joe Klein
    Politics is a contact sport, but sometimes the contact involves a good massage.
    Note: Politics is a contact sport
  • Karla shared from Steve Jobs: The Exclusive Biography by Walter Isaacson
    So in dealing with him, the Mac team adopted an audio concept called a “low pass filter.” In processing his input, they learned to reduce the amplitude of his high-frequency signals. That served to smooth out the data set and provide a less jittery moving average of his evolving attitudes. “After a few cycles of him taking alternating extreme positions,” said Hertzfeld, “we would learn to low pass filter his signals and not react to the extremes.”
    Note: Heh, this is magic. My main weapon against stress.
  • Karla shared from Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat by Bee Wilson
    These early cans of food were not without problems. The most immediate was that there was a lag of fifty years between Appert’s discovery and the invention of the first can openers. This is a glaring example of how technology can proceed in fits and starts. Until the 1860s, cans of bully beef (much used by armies) or salmon or cling peaches would come with instructions to “cut round the top near the outer edge with a chisel and hammer.
  • Karla shared from Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat by Bee Wilson
    Eating with a knife and fork carries with it a complacency that is not always justified. It is a very fussy way of eating food. We often overattribute efficiency to the technologies we are accustomed to. Because we use knives and forks every day, we do not notice how they hamper us. Our table manners require us to use two hands to perform with less dexterity what chopsticks can do with only one.
    Note: We often over attribute efficiency to the technologies we are already accustomed to
  • Karla shared from Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat by Bee Wilson
    The customer who bought the Cuisinart kept coming back for more utensils: for “balloon whisks and copper pots and then for whatever was needed once they were launched on a new cooking venture.” The machine had got them hooked on the whole process of ambitious cooking.
    Note: When products empower customers
(São Paulo, SP, BRA)
Karla Amaral Lopez