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  • Katie shared from The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) by Sandra M. Gilbert, Susan Gubar
    Strengthening the chaste maiden in her passivity, they have made her into precisely the eternally beautiful, inanimate objet d’art patriarchal aesthetics want a girl to be. From the point of view of the mad, self-assertive Queen, conventional female arts kill. But from the point of view of the docile and selfless princess, such arts, even while they kill, confer the only measure of power available to a woman in a patriarchal culture.
  • Katie shared from The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (Yale Nota Bene S) by Sandra M. Gilbert, Susan Gubar
    The girl finally falls, killed, so it seems, by the female arts of cosmetology and cookery. Paradoxically, however, even though the Queen has been using such feminine wiles as the sirens’ comb and Eve’s apple subversively, to destroy angelic Snow White so that she (the Queen) can assert and aggrandize herself, these arts have had on her daughter an opposite effect from those she intended.
  • Katie shared from Feminism: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) by Margaret Walters
    If feminism is to be something living and evolving, it will have to begin by re-inventing the wheel – which in this case means finding not just new issues, but a new language.
  • Katie shared from Glamour by Carol Dyhouse
    Exploring the role of glamour in history shows that it has often served to express a sense of aspiration and entitlement for women as well as a dream of escape from hardship and the everyday. Glamorous women have often expressed an attitude of self-possession and assertiveness in conflict with traditional models of femininity rather than in conformity with them. Glamour has often been perceived as transgressive.
  • Katie shared from Glamour by Carol Dyhouse
    There are aspects of the glamour industries that we may deplore, particularly the ways in which advertisers and manufacturers exploit the insecurities of consumers. This is a criticism that can be levelled at most consumer industries. There are clearly problems with the extent to which we invest in appearances, and younger women are prone to particular anxieties about their appearance, as older women are prone to lament their wrinkles and the loss of their youth. But we do have choices, and most women are probably capable of enjoying glamour without deluding themselves into a denial of other values...