Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Katie shared from Ageing, Popular Culture and Contemporary Feminism: Harleys and Hormones by Imelda Whelehan, Joel Gwynne
    While many recent texts, including Hollywood blockbusters, excise and pathologise the old body, the medium of film can make ageing both audible and visible, providing space for children to sympathise with this embodied experience. Within children’s fantasy, there is a kinship between the child and the elderly whereby both seek – and often succeed in obtaining – independence despite their undeveloped or disintegrating bodies.
  • Katie shared from Ageing, Popular Culture and Contemporary Feminism: Harleys and Hormones by Imelda Whelehan, Joel Gwynne
    The films evince Hollywood’s own underlying attitudes towards ageing female stars, celebrated in maturity, but threatened with rejection in old age, particularly if they artificially hold on to youth. When the aged female body is thus pathologised, young and old are potentially alienated, and anxieties are promoted in those facing old age.
  • Katie shared from Ageing, Popular Culture and Contemporary Feminism: Harleys and Hormones by Imelda Whelehan, Joel Gwynne
    In such films, there is little or no explanation of the witch’s desire for youth; her desire is simply incorporated into her evil activities, thereby implying that such desire is depraved.
  • Katie shared from Ageing, Popular Culture and Contemporary Feminism: Harleys and Hormones by Imelda Whelehan, Joel Gwynne
    This application of childishness is used to restrict the embodied subjectivity of the young and old by deeming them outside the boundaries of a mature prime. The thorny question of agency is thus linked to the embedding of childishness within young and old bodies,
  • Katie shared from Ageing, Popular Culture and Contemporary Feminism: Harleys and Hormones by Imelda Whelehan, Joel Gwynne
    Childhood itself is a state of slippage, its boundaries constantly renegotiated by texts as social and cultural contexts, laws and mores – including sexual consent, education and labour laws – change. Like childhood, old age is defined by age, but that age varies depending on a wide range of factors including retirement, menopause, physical decline and even the grey hairs on a person’s head or wrinkles on their face. Old age, like childhood, is a slippery construct and the agency of the aged is likewise a vexed question since despite adult autonomy, physical infirmity and post-reproductive...