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  • Katie shared from The Unruly Woman (Texas Film and Media Studies Series) by Kathleen Rowe
    Because melodrama concerns the heroine who fails to resolve the Oedipal passage, it leaves the pre-Oedipal mother-daughter bond intact. As Nancy Chodorow has explained, the intense love between mother and daughter, not mother and son, stands as our culture’s primary taboo. Patriarchy is deeply threatened by this bond, whether it takes the form of the connections between mothers and daughters, or, more generally, the solidarity among women, or,
  • Katie shared from The Unruly Woman (Texas Film and Media Studies Series) by Kathleen Rowe
    However, while romantic comedy and melodrama both tie a woman’s rebellion to her acceptance or refusal of the terms of heterosexuality, melodrama dooms her rebellion from the start, not only teaching that a woman’s lot under patriarchy is to suffer but making that suffering pleasurable. Exposing
  • Katie shared from The Unruly Woman (Texas Film and Media Studies Series) by Kathleen Rowe
    If melodrama offers women “guilty pleasures,” then so too does romantic comedy, which covers up with laughter the costs of a woman’s acceptance of her proper place in patriarchy. Romantic comedy tolerates, and even encourages, its heroine’s short-lived rebellion because that rebellion ultimately serves the interest of the hero.
  • Katie shared from The Unruly Woman (Texas Film and Media Studies Series) by Kathleen Rowe
    Romantic comedy usually contains a potential melodrama, and melodrama a potential romantic comedy. Melodrama depends on a belief in the possibility of romantic comedy’s happy ending, a belief that heightens the pathos of its loss. Similarly, romantic comedy depends on the melodramatic threat that the lovers won’t get together and that the heroine will suffer the fate of becoming a spinster or of marrying the wrong man. But while critics have exerted considerable effort to preserve the distinctions between drama on the high plane and its “others”—melodrama or comedy—no such stakes are...
  • Katie shared from The Unruly Woman (Texas Film and Media Studies Series) by Kathleen Rowe
    Comedy breaks taboos and expresses those impulses which are always outside the social.8 Where comedy is, so are food, sex, excrement, blasphemy—usually presented obliquely enough to be socially acceptable. Comedy,
(England)
Katie