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  • Katie shared from Existentialism and Contemporary Cinema: A Beauvoirian Perspective by Jean-Pierre Boulé, Ursula Tidd
    In Old Age, as already mentioned, Beauvoir argues that for the old, it is ‘the Other’ who is old and not the person they experience themselves as being. Eventually the old person will accept the image that others have of them but not without difficulties, a period that Beauvoir defines as an identification crisis. In her chapter ‘Time, Activity and History’ she claims that ageing transforms our relationship to time. If old people love to talk about the past, it is because in fact ‘they refuse time’ (Beauvoir 1972: 361) and do not want to see decline in themselves. They prefer to keep...
  • Katie shared from Existentialism and Contemporary Cinema: A Beauvoirian Perspective by Jean-Pierre Boulé, Ursula Tidd
    Beauvoir argues that in the demand for reciprocal relationships, the old person ‘is defined by an exis, not a praxis: a being not a doing’ (Beauvoir 1972: 217) because time is carrying the aged towards death, which is unavoidable and not part of a personal project. Thus, the aged are not perceived as transcendent subjects. In
  • Katie shared from Existentialism and Contemporary Cinema: A Beauvoirian Perspective by Jean-Pierre Boulé, Ursula Tidd
    Beauvoir argues that ‘old age is more apparent to others than to the subject himself’ (Beauvoir 1972: 284), and that ‘within me it is the Other – that is to say the person I am for the outsider – who is old: and that Other is myself’ (Beauvoir 1972: 284). In other words, the old person has no choice but to eventually accept the Other’s view of her as an old person. One
  • Katie shared from Existentialism and Contemporary Cinema: A Beauvoirian Perspective by Jean-Pierre Boulé, Ursula Tidd
    Beauvoir argues that in western culture the aged are the Other of those who are economically active and there is a generational power relationship between the dominant group (young active men) and the oppressed (the aged): ‘by the way in which a society behaves towards its old people it uncovers the naked, and often carefully hidden truth about its real principles and aims’ (Beauvoir 1972: 87).
  • Katie shared from Existentialism and Contemporary Cinema: A Beauvoirian Perspective by Jean-Pierre Boulé, Ursula Tidd
    Her study shows that old age is not a universal category and that to understand its meaning it is essential to consider how the individual’s experience of ageing is always situated in a cultural, social, geographical and historical context. Women and men for example experience ageing differently because of their differing roles in patriarchal societies. Beauvoir also highlights the fact that class struggle informs the experience of ageing.
(England)
Katie