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  • Katie shared from Glamour: A History by Stephen Gundle
    Glamour is always theatrical; it is a performance or parade that has no meaning unless it is widely viewed. Indeed, it is only through the perception and reception of visual effects that it comes into existence. For this reason, it is rarely subtle or complex. Glamour is an image that attracts attention and arouses envy by mobilizing desirable qualities including beauty, wealth, movement, leisure, fame, and sex. Bright colours, ostentatious signs of wealth, showy beauty, visible suggestions of sex are required to reach a mass public. There
  • Katie shared from Glamour: A History by Stephen Gundle
    As the consumption economy and the mass media developed, so the spectacle became more systematic: shop windows, posters, commercial publicity stunts, and professional performance gave the world of glamour a stable and predictable form. Cosmetics, fashion goods, accessories, and other goods that could be worn or carried fuelled the imagination. They were especially suggestive since they bore directly on personal identity and promised the immediate realization of a transformation of the self into something different and better.
  • Katie shared from Glamour: A History by Stephen Gundle
    From its origins, glamour has been associated with dreaming. The yearning for a better, richer, more exciting, and materially lavish life accompanied the development of modern consumerism and fuelled innumerable fantasies and fictions. Glamour took shape as an enticing image of the fabulous life that was lived before the eyes of everyone. Glamour provided the illusion that individual lives could be enhanced and improved by ostensibly magical means. The image was sustained and perpetuated by cultural products and commercial entertainments. It could also be approached through the practices of consumption,...
  • Katie shared from Glamour: A History by Stephen Gundle
    A product of applied technology, plastic was a great innovation that somehow encapsulated the pliant femininity of the period.68 This aesthetic lives on in the Barbie doll. A product of the late 1950s, it offered an image of perfect, constructed femininity in moulded plastic form. As a toy, it provided girls with a consumption ideal; as an exaggerated, inorganic feminine image, devoted to waste and self-fashioning, it also offered a new version of the artificial female model of the late nineteenth century. Like a film star, Barbie offered a face full of nothing that demanded that she be transformed...
  • Katie shared from Glamour: A History by Stephen Gundle
    Like mannequins, stars showed clothes, cosmetics, and other products to excellent effect. The movies helped people to dream and the apparatus of consumerism assisted them in partially turning those dreams into lived experience. Commercial
(England)
Katie