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  • Katie shared from Stardom: Industry of Desire by Christine Gledhill
    Through the use of cosmetic products, then, as well as through the purchasing and use of clothing, spectators take on a part of the stars identity and make it part of their own. The self and the ideal combine to produce another feminine identity, closer to the ideal. This
  • Katie shared from Stardom: Industry of Desire by Christine Gledhill
    Stars are thus identified with particular commodities which are part of the reproduction of feminine identities. The female spectators in these examples produce particular images of femininity which remind them of their favourite stars. In so doing they produce a new feminine identity, one which combines an aspect of the star with their own appearance. This is different from imitation, which is more of a temporary reproduction of a particular kind of behaviour which resembles the star. It transforms the spectators’ previous appearance, and in doing so offers the spectator the pleasure of close...
  • Katie shared from Stardom: Industry of Desire by Christine Gledhill
    The purchasing of items such as clothing and cosmetics in relation to particular stars brings into particularly sharp focus the relationship between the cinema industries and other forms of capitalist industry. Stars are consumable feminine images which female spectators then reproduce through other forms of consumption.
  • Katie shared from Stardom: Industry of Desire by Christine Gledhill
    Copying the hairstyles of famous film stars can be seen as a form of cultural production and consumption. It involves the production of a new self-image through the pleasure taken in a star image. In
  • Katie shared from Stardom: Industry of Desire by Christine Gledhill
    These forms of copying involve some kind of self-transformation to produce an appearance more similar to Hollywood stars. Some
(England)
Katie