About Keith Crawford

A geek that loves God and tries to live like it. Engineer & Tech Sherpa.

Recent Activity

  • Keith shared from Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why by Laurence Gonzales
    The idea of chaos theory is that what appears to be a very complex, turbulent system (the weather, for example) can begin with simple components (water, air, earth), operating under a few simple rules (heat and gravity). One of the characteristics of such a system is that a small change in the initial conditions, often too small to measure, can lead to radically different behavior.
    Note: simple [beautiful] explanation of chaos theory
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    If God does not raise up inspired leaders who can guide people into worship with authority and compassion, then the experience of worship will be nearly impossible. This is the reason for the leadership gifts of the Spirit (Eph. 4:11). Worship leaders who are called out by God must not be shy about their leadership. People need to be led into worship: from the Outer Court to the Inner Court and finally into the Holy of Holies. God anoints leaders to bring people through this progression into worship.
    Note: Intriguing to consider the progression of corporate worship in these temple terms.
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    We crave things we neither need nor enjoy. “We buy things we do not want to impress people we do not like.”2 Where planned obsolescence leaves off, psychological obsolescence takes over. We are made to feel ashamed to wear clothes or drive cars until they are worn out. The mass media have convinced us that to be out of step with fashion is to be out of step with reality. It is time we awaken to the fact that conformity to a sick society is to be sick.
    Note: "Conformity to a sick society is to be sick."
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    He that to what he sees, adds observation, and to what he reads, reflection, is in the right road to knowledge, provided that in scrutinizing the hearts of others, he neglects not his own.
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    How quickly we crave things we do not need until we are enslaved by them. Paul writes, “‘All things are lawful for me,’ but I will not be enslaved by anything” (1 Cor. 6:12).
    Note: Entirely too true-
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    We begin praying for others by first quieting our fleshly activity and listening to the silent thunder of the Lord of hosts. Attuning ourselves to divine breathings is spiritual work, but without it our praying is vain repetition (Matt. 6:7). Listening to the Lord is the first thing, the second thing, and the third thing necessary for successful intercession. Søren Kierkegaard once observed: “A man prayed, and at first he thought that prayer was talking. But he became more and more quiet until in the end he realized that prayer is listening.”7
    Note: Effective intercessory prayer is one marked by listening…
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    In contemporary society our Adversary majors in three things: noise, hurry, and crowds. If he can keep us engaged in “muchness” and “manyness,” he will rest satisfied. Psychiatrist Carl Jung once remarked, “Hurry is not of the Devil; it is the Devil.”1
    Note: The enemy in noise, hurry, & crowds.
  • Keith shared from Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster
    When we despair of gaining inner transformation through human powers of will and determination, we are open to a wonderful new realization: inner righteousness is a gift from God to be graciously received. The needed change within us is God’s work, not ours. The demand is for an inside job, and only God can work from the inside. We cannot attain or earn this righteousness of the kingdom of God; it is a grace that is given.
    Note: Understanding our futile efforts to overcome sin we discover…
(Little Rock, AR)
Keith Crawford