Recent Activity

  • Koan-Sin shared from Inferno: A Novel by Dan Brown
    Langdon returned his focus to the iPhone, and within seconds was able to pull up a link to a digital offering of The Divine Comedy—freely accessible because it was in the public domain. When the page opened precisely to Canto 25, he had to admit he was impressed with the technology. I’ve got to stop being such a snob about leather-bound books, he reminded himself. E-books do have their moments.
    Note: Yes, "books do have their moments"
  • Koan-Sin shared from Inferno: A Novel by Dan Brown
    “Dim mak,” the blond said casually to the tall man. “Chinese pressure points. There’s a reason they’ve been around for three millennia.”
    Note: Dan Brown 的書竟然出現點穴了
  • Koan-Sin shared from Inferno: A Novel by Dan Brown
    “It appears Robert Langdon just accessed his Harvard e-mail account from an unmasked IP address.” She paused, locking eyes with the provost. “Langdon’s precise location is now traceable.” The provost was stunned that anyone could be so foolish.
  • Koan-Sin shared from Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming by Peter Seibel
    A decade or two ago there was HyperCard and lots of teachers were able to understand that and do useful things in it. It's really strange that that whole experience didn't naturally go right into the Web. I think there's still a role to be filled there with tools as simple as HyperCard and as immediate as the Web.
  • Koan-Sin shared from Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming by Peter Seibel
    Gosh, here we have Smalltalk, which has this really great code-generation machinery, which is now very mature-it's about 20 years old and it's extremely reliable. It's a relatively simple, relatively retargetable, quite efficient just-in-time code generator that's designed to work really well with non type-declared languages. On the other hand, here's Python, which is this wonderful language with these wonderful libraries and a slow-as-mud implementation. Wouldn't it be nice if we could bring the two together?
  • Koan-Sin shared from Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming by Peter Seibel
    On the ParcPlace Smalltalk virtual machine I worked only on the just-in-time compiler, which was probably 20 percent of it, and that was probably in the low single-digit thousands of lines of C. Maybe 3,000, 5,000-something like that.
  • Koan-Sin shared from Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming by Peter Seibel
    I wanted to have one to play with and I couldn't get my hands on the Building 26 mainframe. So I did my Lisp implementation on the PDP-1.
  • Koan-Sin shared from The Secret Life of Words: How English Became English by Henry Hitchings
    In one sense, English has proved to be a whore among languages: in order for it to lay itself open to new intrusions or infusions, there has usually had to be a clear offer of reward.
  • Koan-Sin shared from Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe by George Dyson
    “I remember reading Turing’s paper in the Trinity College library in 1942,” says Freeman Dyson, “and thinking ‘what a brilliant piece of mathematical work!’ But I never imagined anyone putting these results to practical use.”
  • Koan-Sin shared from Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe by George Dyson
    On January 2, 1940, Gödel cabled von Neumann with the news. “The only complication which remains,” Gödel reported to Aydelotte, “is that I shall have to take the route through Russia and Japan.”19
    Note: 以前讀書沒有注意到 Gödel 聯離開維也納到米國也是如此精彩