Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Kristan shared from The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement by David Brooks
    Learning is not merely about accumulating facts. It is internalizing the relationships between pieces of information.
    Note: Exactly!
  • Kristan shared from Stealth of Nations: The Global Rise of the Informal Economy by Robert Neuwirth
    Our merchants and master-manufacturers complain much of the bad effects of high wages in raising the price, and thereby lessening the sale of their goods both at home and abroad. They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. —The Wealth of Nations
    Note: Interesting insight from Wealth of Nations
  • Kristan shared from Collaborative Intelligence: Using Teams to Solve Hard Problems (BK Business) by J. Richard Hackman
    Irish Truth: “Something that, although not actually true, is required to sustain the narrative.”
    Note: Definition of an "Irish Truth" from one of my favorite books
  • Kristan shared from Effectual Entrepreneurship by Stuart Read, Nick Dew, Saras Sarasvathy, Robert Wiltbank, Anne-Valérie Ohlsson
    Consider customers versus lenders versus investors versus co-founders and the ownership and control they enjoy in exchange for their commitment to the venture. Customers might have no ownership of your organization, yet they exert a lot of “control” in the form of influence and leverage, especially early on in the life of your organization.
    Note: Awesome insight from a book I am really enjoying.
  • Kristan shared from Effectual Entrepreneurship by Stuart Read, Nick Dew, Saras Sarasvathy, Robert Wiltbank, Anne-Valérie Ohlsson
    There has been an entire body of academic research around agency theory. The fundamental observation is that owners explicitly don’t control the operation of the firm, they sub contract the control to agents, i.e. the CEO, etc., who exercise that control. It is possible to control a large firm with relatively small amounts of ownership, if any at all.
    Note: Something new analysts in business routinely miss.