Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Kristian shared from Diet Cults: The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of US by Matt Fitzgerald
    The pressure to not eat what one’s group did not want one to eat was so severe that a propensity to make moral judgments based on others’ food choices became hardwired into human behavior.
  • Kristian shared from Berkshire Hathaway Letters to Shareholders, 2014 by Warren Buffett
    Most managers have very little incentive to make the intelligent-but-with-some-chance-of-looking-like-an-idiot decision. Their personal gain/loss ratio is all too obvious: if an unconventional decision works out well, they get a pat on the back and, if it works out poorly, they get a pink slip. (Failing conventionally is the route to go; as a group, lemmings may have a rotten image, but no individual lemming has ever received bad press.)
  • Kristian shared from Managing Oneself (Harvard Business Review Classics) by Peter Ferdinand Drucker
    He rarely asked his associates for comments or questions; he simply needed an audience to hear himself talk. That’s how he learned. And although he is a fairly extreme case, learning through talking is by no means an unusual method. Successful trial lawyers learn the same way, as do many medical diagnosticians (and so do I).
  • Kristian shared from Berkshire Hathaway Letters to Shareholders, 2014 by Warren Buffett
    Equally important, our corporate policy is to retain that superiority. The buyer of insurance receives only a promise in exchange for his cash. The value of that promise should be appraised against the possibility of adversity, not prosperity.
  • Kristian shared from Managing Oneself (Harvard Business Review Classics) by Peter Ferdinand Drucker
    Far too many people—especially people with great expertise in one area—are contemptuous of knowledge in other areas or believe that being bright is a substitute for knowledge.
(Copenhagen, Denmark)
Kristian Holte