About Les Lamb

Pastor of many, father of two, husband of one. Forgetful, frank and foolish at times, but deeply grateful.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Les shared from Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus by Kyle Idleman
    So they signed up to follow Jesus, but if denying themselves was part of the explanation, it was definitely the fine print. That’s especially true of American Christians. In part, this is due to the collision of Christianity with American capitalism. It has created a culture of consumers in our churches. Instead of approaching their faith with a spirit of denial that says, “What can I do for Jesus?” they have a consumer mentality that says, “What can Jesus do for me?”
  • Les shared from Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus by Kyle Idleman
    What the rich young ruler is really committed to is revealed when he refuses to deny himself. He wanted to say yes to following Jesus without saying no to himself.
  • Les shared from Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus by Kyle Idleman
    What is it that really gets you excited? Recently I was watching a college football game on TV when my twelve-year-old daughter came in and said, “I’ve never seen you so excited.” She has seen me baptize new believers. She saw my reaction to the birth of her baby brother. She has seen me take her out for many daddy/daughter dates. But she has never seen me more excited than watching a college football game. Ouch.
    Note: About what do you get most excited in life?
  • Les shared from How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer
    Consider this experiment: Drazen Prelec and Duncan Simester, two business professors at MIT, organized a real-life, sealed-bid auction for tickets to a Boston Celtics game. Half the participants in the auction were informed that they had to pay with cash; the other half were told they had to pay with credit cards. Prelec and Simester then averaged the bids for the two different groups. Lo and behold, the average credit card bid was twice as high as the average cash bid. When people used their Visas and MasterCards, their bids were much more reckless. They no longer felt the need to contain their...
    Note: Wow.
  • Les shared from Introverts in the Church: Finding Our Place in an Extroverted Culture by Adam S. McHugh
    Because of these assumptions in many churches about what constitutes participation, we can become convinced that the faithful word in the Christian life is always yes. When we are asked to participate in an activity or group or sharing time, if we are really committed to community, if we truly trust God, we think we must answer "yes."
  • Les shared from Introverts in the Church: Finding Our Place in an Extroverted Culture by Adam S. McHugh
    "Let the guest come so that the host may be healed." AFRICAN PROVERB
  • Les shared from Introverts in the Church: Finding Our Place in an Extroverted Culture by Adam S. McHugh
    Introverts, on the other hand, require less dopamine, and when our brains have too much, we can feel anxious or overwhelmed. Our brains rely more on another neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system, which conserves and restores energy, producing a "rest and repose" posture. It produces a pleasurable sensation in introverts when we are thinking and reflecting.
  • Les shared from Introverts in the Church: Finding Our Place in an Extroverted Culture by Adam S. McHugh
    The slant toward extroversion in the larger culture has also infiltrated the church. I interviewed dozens of introverted Christians, and without exception, they expressed some degree of frustration and sense of exclusion from their churches. Many have found that their churches, in both theology and practice, are not accommodating to people of their temperament. These introverts have difficulty finding a place in their communities where they feel encouraged to be who they are and to serve in a way that is consistent with their nature.
  • Les shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    When encouraging shy children to speak, says Johnson, it helps to make the topic so compelling that they forget their inhibitions.
    Note: True for adults, too!
  • Les shared from Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain
    Moreover, they tell us that the Extrovert Ideal is not as sacrosanct as we may have thought. So if, deep down, you’ve been thinking that it’s only natural for the bold and sociable to dominate the reserved and sensitive, and that the Extrovert Ideal is innate to humanity, Robert McCrae’s personality map suggests a different truth: that each way of being—quiet and talkative, careful and audacious, inhibited and unrestrained—is characteristic of its own mighty civilization.
(Courtice, Ontario, Canada)
Les Lamb