About Luis Guillermo Pineda

Historian, Philosopher and a Radical for Capitalism Laissez-faire who lives life as a Bon Vivant.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Luis shared from The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
    But he was lonely. It was not like the sensation in Paris of being alone yet not alone. He had imagined himself acquiring a bright new circle of friends with whom he would start a new life with new attitudes, standards, and habits that would be far better and clearer than those he had had all his life.
    Note: "But he was lonely. It was not like the sensation in Paris of being alone yet not alone."
  • Luis shared from The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
    But he was lonely. It was not like the sensation in Paris of being alone yet not alone. He had imagined himself acquiring a bright new circle of friends with whom he would start a new life with new attitudes, standards, and habits that would be far better and clearer than those he had had all his life.
    Note: "But he was lonely. It was not like the sensation in Paris of being alone yet not alone."
  • Luis shared from The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
    He felt alone, yet not at all lonely. It was very much like the feeling on Christmas Eve in Paris, a feeling that everyone was watching him, as if he had an audience made up of the entire world, a feeling that kept him on his mettle, because to make a mistake would be catastrophic.
    Note: "He felt alone, yet not at all lonely."
  • Luis shared from The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
    He felt alone, yet not at all lonely. It was very much like the feeling on Christmas Eve in Paris, a feeling that everyone was watching him, as if he had an audience made up of the entire world, a feeling that kept him on his mettle, because to make a mistake would be catastrophic.
    Note: "He felt alone, yet not at all lonely."
  • Luis shared from Anarchism and Other Essays by Emma Goldman
    Commendable as this is, I fear it is impossible to hope for good results from pouring good wine into a musty bottle. Nothing short of a complete reconstruction of society will deliver mankind from the cancer of crime. Still, if the dull edge of our social conscience would be sharpened, the penal institutions might be given a new coat of varnish. But the first step to be taken is the renovation of the social consciousness, which is in a rather dilapidated condition. It is sadly in need to be awakened to the fact that crime is a question of degree, that we all have the rudiments of crime in us,...
    Note: Agree: Before anything changes in society for good it is necessary a renovation of social consciousness aka. A Moral Revolution. Without it taking place first, nothing else really matters.
(Copenhagen, Denmark)
Luis Guillermo Pineda