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  • Lydia shared from Anselm of Canterbury: The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics) by St. Anselm
    For suppose someone assigns his bondslave a task, and tells him not to leap into a pit from which he cannot by any means climb out, and that bondslave, despising the command and advice of his master, leaps into the pit which has been pointed out to him, so that he is completely unable to carry out the task assigned to him. Do you think that his incapacity serves in the slightest as a valid excuse for him not to perform the task assigned to him? B. Not at all. It serves, rather, to increase his guilt, since he has brought the incapacity upon himself. For indeed he has sinned in two ways: in having...
  • Lydia shared from Anselm of Canterbury: The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics) by St. Anselm
    For suppose someone assigns his bondslave a task, and tells him not to leap into a pit from which he cannot by any means climb out, and that bondslave, despising the command and advice of his master, leaps into the pit which has been pointed out to him, so that he is completely unable to carry out the task assigned to him. Do you think that his incapacity serves in the slightest as a valid excuse for him not to perform the task assigned to him? B. Not at all. It serves, rather, to increase his guilt, since he has brought the incapacity upon himself. For indeed he has sinned in two ways: in having...
    Note: Responsibility without ability is starting to make sense to me!
  • Lydia shared from Anselm of Canterbury: The Major Works (Oxford World's Classics) by St. Anselm
    For the devil was not acting in this way at the command of God, but with the permission of God’s incomprehensible wisdom, by which he orders even bad things in a way that is good.
  • Lydia shared from Taking Hold of God: Reformed and Puritan Perspectives on Prayer by Brian Najapfour, Joel Beeke
    I fear the prayer of John Knox more than the combined armies of Europe. —MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS
    Note: John Knox, mighty prayer warrior
  • Lydia shared from Taking Hold of God: Reformed and Puritan Perspectives on Prayer by Brian Najapfour, Joel Beeke
    In his commentary on the Psalms, Calvin focuses on singing as a part of prayer that helps lift up the heart to God. The Psalms are, in themselves, a prayer book, for they are “an anatomy of all the parts of the soul.” In the commentary’s preface, Calvin says that prayer proceeds “from a sense of our need, and next, from faith in the promises of God.” He says that the Psalms are particularly helpful in making believers aware of their need, and they also tell where to find the “remedies for their cure.”[99] The Psalms, whether sung individually or corporately, teach us to place our...
    Note: the psalms and prayer
(Phoenix, AZ USA)
Lydia E. Hamre